U.S. wins Concacaf Women’s Championship with 2-0 win over Canada

ConcacafOctober 17

Concacaf Women’s Championship Final: Canada vs. United States

ConcacafOctober 17

Imani Dorsey’s ride to Rookie of the Year

FeatureOctober 16

Canada, U.S. qualify for 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup

ConcacafOctober 14

Concacaf Women’s Championship semifinals schedule: Canada vs. Panama, U.S. vs. Jamaica

ConcacafOctober 12

Canada, Jamaica advance to Concacaf Women’s Championship semifinals; Costa Rica eliminated

ConcacafOctober 12

U.S., Panama advance to Concacaf Women’s Championship semifinals; Mexico eliminated

ConcacafOctober 11

Switzerland and the Netherlands advance to final play-off for UEFA’s final World Cup berth

UEFAOctober 09

Leon scores four as Canada picks up 12-0 win over Cuba; Jamaica beats Costa Rica 1-0

ConcacafOctober 08

Five NWSL players nominated for 2018 Women’s Ballon d’Or

NewsOctober 08

United States, Mexico pick up wins on second day of Group A play

ConcacafOctober 07

Prince scores twice as Canada opens up World Cup qualifying with 2-0 win over Jamaica

ConcacafOctober 05

UEFA play-offs schedule & results; Schedule of NWSL players on international duty

NewsOctober 05

U.S. opens World Cup qualifying with 6-0 win over Mexico

ConcacafOctober 04

Concacaf Women’s Championship begins Thursday

ConcacafOctober 03

Field Level: NWSL Championship

HighlightsOctober 02

No players selected off Re-Entry Wire

NewsOctober 02

NWSL teams exercise contract options, extend contract offers

NewsOctober 01

NWSL players available on the Re-Entry Wire

NewsOctober 01

Portland fans keep standards high at a record-setting final

NWSL ChampionshipSeptember 27

The 2018 NWSL Championship in photos

NWSL ChampionshipSeptember 27

Goalkeeper of the Year: Adrianna Franch, Portland Thorns FC

NWSL AwardsSeptember 27

Utah Royals FC to host U.S. Soccer C License course for NWSL players

NewsSeptember 27

Defender of the Year: Abby Erceg, North Carolina Courage

NWSL AwardsSeptember 27

Coach of the Year: Paul Riley

NWSL AwardsSeptember 26

Henninger, Johnson, Murillo named to Mexico’s roster for Concacaf Women’s Championship

NewsSeptember 26

Rookie of the Year: Imani Dorsey, Sky Blue FC

NWSL AwardsSeptember 26

Canada roster set for Concacaf Women’s Championship

CANWNTSeptember 26

NWSL Championship goals in slow motion

NWSL ChampionshipSeptember 25

Seattle Reign FC sign Elise Kellond-Knight

NewsSeptember 24

Marta voted 2018 FIFA The Best Women’s Player

NewsSeptember 24

Seattle Reign FC loan Jess Fishlock to Lyon

NewsSeptember 24

Jessica McDonald comes up big in Portland, named Championship MVP

NWSL ChampionshipSeptember 22

NWSL MVP: Lindsey Horan, Portland Thorns FC

NWSL AwardsSeptember 21

How pressure, adversity, molded the Portland Thorns

NWSL ChampionshipSeptember 21

Courage channeling underdog mentality ahead of NWSL Championship

NWSL ChampionshipSeptember 21

2018 NWSL Best XI and Second XI announced

NWSL AwardsSeptember 20

Vera Pauw leaves the Houston Dash

NewsSeptember 20

North Carolina adapts mid-game, shuts down Chicago’s offense

PlayoffsSeptember 19

U.S. names 20-woman roster for Concacaf Women’s Championship

USWNTSeptember 19

Courage, Thorns to meet in 2018 NWSL Championship; Broadcast, ticket info

PlayoffsSeptember 18

Franch’s big saves kept Portland in the game

PlayoffsSeptember 17

2018 NWSL Awards Finalists

VoteSeptember 16

Semifinal preview: Courage vs. Red Stars

PlayoffsSeptember 15

Courage, Red Stars set to meet again in the NWSL Playoffs

PlayoffsSeptember 15

Orlando Pride and head coach Tom Sermanni part ways

NewsSeptember 14

Courage vs. Red Stars semifinal to be played Tuesday night at Providence Park

NewsSeptember 13

Thorns, Reign set to meet one last time in 2018

PlayoffsSeptember 13

League Leaders

StatsSeptember 13

2018 NWSL Playoffs schedule, broadcast info

PlayoffsSeptember 13

U.S. wins Concacaf Women’s Championship with 2-0 win over Canada

The U.S. finished the tournament with five wins, 26 goals for, 0 goals against

The United States won all five games at the Concacaf Women's Championship. (Photo credit: Brad Smith/isiphotos.com)

The United States beat Canada 2-0 to win the Concacaf Women’s Championship on a rainy night at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas. The United States scored in the first two minutes of the game, and then in the final two minutes of the game to pick up the win. The U.S. finished the tournament with a 5-0 record, 26 goals scored and 0 goals conceded.

Red Stars midfielder Julie Ertz won the Golden Ball, awarded to the best player of the tournament. The United States won the Fair Play Award.

Washington Spirit midfielder Rose Lavelle scored her sixth international goal, and her third goal of this tournament, in the 2nd minute. After an attempted clearance by Pride defender Shelina Zadorsky for Canada, the ball went to Lavelle, who sent a left-footed shot into the bottom right corner to put the U.S. up 1-0.

Morgan sealed the win in the 89th minute with a left-footed tap in after a cross from Portland Thorns FC midfielder Lindsey Horan. After an initial clearance by Canada, Courage midfielder Crystal Dunn found Horan out wide to restart the play. Replays showed Morgan was offside on the goal, but it was not called and the goal stood.

The goal clinched the Concacaf Women’s Championship Golden Boot for Morgan, who finished the tournament with seven goals. It’s her 97th international goal and her 17th of 2018. She has 24 goals in her last 24 games.

“It’s not without my teammates. I mean honestly, the service is just incredible,” Morgan said in a postgame interview with Fox Sports’ Alex Curry on FS1. “So many players had an amazing tournament.”

As expected, it was a physical match between the two sides, with Canada picking up four yellow cards, and the United States picking up one.

“It’s another title. That’s what we’re all about. We want to win. Obviously, we hate Canada. They hate us. That was very apparent on the field today,” Reign forward Megan Rapinoe told Curry. “It was a good performance for us. Really just all tournament. I feel like we took it up another notch.”

Both teams created chances, but couldn’t find the back of the net in between the Lavelle and Morgan goals.

Canada’s Kadeisha Buchanan had a chance in the 24th minute, but Red Stars goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher pushed the header out for a corner kick.

Zadorsky blocked a shot from her Pride teammate Morgan in the 59th minute, after Stephanie Labbé came off her line on a Morgan breakaway. Labbe was forced to make a diving save on a left-footed shot from distance by Rapinoe.

Dunn played a pass to Morgan in the box in the 80th minute, but Morgan’s shot trickled just wide at the far post.

It’s the 26th consecutive game without a loss for the United States. They’ve gone 23-0-3 in those games. They are now 49-3-7 all-time vs. Canada.

Canada finished the tournament with 24 goals scored and three goals conceded.


Panama 2 | Jamaica 2 | Jamaica wins 2-4 in penalties

Earlier Wednesday, Jamaica topped Panama in penalty kicks to advance to their first-ever World Cup. Panama will face Argentina in a two-leg play-off for a spot in France.

Khadija Shaw scored to give Jamaica the lead in the 13th minute, but Panama got a late equalizer from Natalia Mills in the 73rd to send the game to extra time. In the 95th minute, Jamaica took the lead on a goal by 16-year-old Jody Brown, but again Panama tied the match. Lineth Cedeño scored in 115th minute to send the game to penalty kicks.

Jamaica swapped goalkeepers for the shootout and the move paid off as Nicole McClure, who replaced Sydney Schneider, made two stops in the shootout. Jamaica sent all four of their penalties past Panama’s Yenith Bailey to book their spot in France.

After the game, Bailey was awarded the Golden Glove as the tournament’s best goalkeeper. Brown was named Best Young Player.

Eighteen of 24 countries have booked their tickets to France so far: Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China PR, England, France (host nation), Germany, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Korea Republic, Norway, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, Thailand and the United States.

Concacaf Women’s Championship Final: Canada vs. United States

It's the final of the Concacaf Women's Championship

It’ll be Canada vs. the United States on Wednesday night (8 p.m. ET, FS2 & moves to FS1 after baseball) in the final of the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship in Frisco, Texas. Both teams have already qualified for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France, and Wednesday’s game will determine the winner of the tournament.

Earlier Wednesday, Panama and Jamaica will meet in the third-place game (5 p.m. ET, FS2), and both teams still have a chanced to qualify for their first-ever World Cup. The winner will qualify for the tournament and the loser will take on Argentina in a home-and-away playoff for a spot in France. Seventeen of 24 countries have booked their tickets to France so far: Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China PR, England, France (host nation), Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea Republic, Norway, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, Thailand and the United States.

Even though both teams are already in the World Cup, there is still a lot on the line on Wednesday night between the United States and Canada.

  • Portland Thorns FC/Canada forward Christine Sinclair sits at 177 international goals, just seven behind former U.S. women’s national team forward Abby Wambach’s all-time lead of 184. Sinclair has scored four goals this tournament as she approaches the milestone.
  • Canada forward Adriana Leon (Seattle Reign FC) and United States forward Alex Morgan (Orlando Pride) are tied for the tournament lead with six goals. Morgan has scored 23 goals in her last 23 games. Leon recorded four goals in Canada’s rout of Cuba in the group stage.
  • United States midfielder Lindsey Horan (Portland Thorns FC) and forward Megan Rapinoe (Seattle Reign FC) are tied with Canada’s Nichelle Prince (Houston Dash) and Sophie Schmidt for the tournament lead with three assists.
  • Canada and the United States are tied with 24 goals. Canada has allowed one goal in the tournament, and the United States has not allowed a goal this tournament.
  • The United States is riding a 25-game unbeaten streak, going 22-0-3 in that span.
  • The United States is 48-3-7 all-time against Canada.

If the score is tied after 90 minutes in the final or third-place game, extra time and, if needed, penalty kicks will be played.

For coverage of the Concacaf Women’s Championship, follow the NWSL on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Use the hashtag #CWC to follow the tournament.


NWSL players on Concacaf Women’s Championship rosters:

Canada: Lindsay Agnew (Houston Dash), Allysha Chapman (Houston Dash), Shelina Zadorsky (Orlando Pride), Rebecca Quinn (Washington Spirit), Diana Matheson (Utah Royals FC), Adriana Leon (Seattle Reign FC), Nichelle Prince (Houston Dash), Christine Sinclair (Portland Thorns FC), Kailen Sheridan (Sky Blue FC)

United States: Ashlyn Harris (Orlando Pride), Alyssa Naeher (Chicago Red Stars), Abby Dahlkemper (North Carolina Courage), Crystal Dunn (North Carolina Courage), Kelley O’Hara (Utah Royals FC), Becky Sauerbrunn (Utah Royals FC), Casey Short (Chicago Red Stars), Emily Sonnett (Portland Thorns FC), Morgan Brian (Chicago Red Stars), Julie Ertz (Chicago Red Stars), Lindsey Horan (Portland Thorns FC;), Rose Lavelle (Washington Spirit), Samantha Mewis (North Carolina Courage), Tobin Heath (Portland Thorns FC), Carli Lloyd (Sky Blue FC), Alex Morgan (Orlando Pride), Christen Press (Utah Royals FC), Mallory Pugh (Washington Spirit), Megan Rapinoe (Seattle Reign FC)


October 14

Toyota Stadium; Frisco, Texas

Canada vs. Panama | 5 p.m. ET | FS1
United States vs. Jamaica | 8 p.m. ET | FS1

 

October 17

Toyota Stadium; Frisco, Texas

Third-place match: Panama vs. Jamaica | 5 p.m. ET| FS2
Championship: Canada vs. United States | 8 p.m. ET| FS1

 


Ticket info via U.S. Soccer:

FRISCO, TEXAS

Tickets for the semifinals, Third-Place Match and the Championship Game at the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship are currently on sale through ussoccer.com, by phone at 1-855-492-8053 and at the Toyota Stadium Ticket Office.

Groups of 20 or more can order directly at ussoccer.com.

Coaches Circle and Presidents Circle members supporting the U.S. Soccer Development Fund can receive individual customer support and concierge services for their ticketing needs. Click here or contact circles@ussoccer.org for more information.

Imani Dorsey’s ride to Rookie of the Year

Sky Blue FC forward Imani Dorsey earned the 2018 NWSL Rookie of the Year award

Imani Dorsey scored four goals and had one assist in her rookie season for Sky Blue. (Photo credit: Howard C. Smith/isiphotos.com)

Imani Dorsey’s rookie season in the National Women’s Soccer League started differently than most. Selected fifth in the 2018 NWSL College Draft, Dorsey was the first player selected to be in attendance in Philadelphia. But what few knew, until she revealed it in her speech at the podium after her name was called, was that Dorsey’s ride to the draft wasn’t as poised as her finishing in the final third.

Dorsey was supposed to fly from Durham, North Carolina, to Philadelphia the day before the draft, but due to bad weather she had multiple flights canceled.

“I remember being on the phone with my mom [after all the flights were canceled] and thinking I didn’t know if I wanted to go anymore, I didn’t know if I was going to get picked, and I just didn’t want to worry about that,” Dorsey told NWSL Media over the phone earlier this month, following her first professional season.

That was when her former assistant coach at Duke, Erwin van Bennekom, suggested they drive there together. Eight-plus hours later, the two arrived in Philadelphia at 2:30 a.m.

“The roads were really bad in North Carolina. They were very icy, so it was probably actually dangerous, but we knew it was going to get better in Virginia, so we just kept going. I guess that’s what kept me awake because it was kind of scary!”

Although surely sleepy-eyed by the time her name was called eight hours after she arrived in Philadelphia, Dorsey’s drive through the winter storm felt worth it. She would soon be joining a New Jersey team that was close enough to her family in Maryland and she would get to play again with her former Blue Devil teammate Christina Gibbons.

“I mean, I think the draft has kind of been the story of my whole season. That I would have initial apprehension, nerves and worries all before things would turn out better than I could have ever imagined.”

After Dorsey was drafted, she didn’t join Sky Blue right away because she had to complete her studies at Duke. Dorsey studied environmental science and policy at school and spent the beginning of the NWSL season completing her honors thesis along with balancing training. To stay fit and ready for when her time would come to join Sky Blue full-time, she practiced with her former team at Duke.

“Whenever they were training, I would play with them. I ran fitness on my own and lifted on my own,” Dorsey said.

Dorsey didn’t play for Sky Blue until June 8 and said that leading up to joining the team fully, getting signed to a contract, and then earning a starting position, reminded her of that long drive to the draft.

“It was crazy. I remember just seeing the results coming in at the beginning of the season,” Dorsey said of Sky Blue’s winless start. “I kept thinking, ‘Wow, I need to show my worth and show that I belong on this team.'”

Dorsey did more than show she belonged — she ended up being voted 2018 NWSL Rookie of the Year. After making her professional debut vs. the Washington Spirit, Dorsey went on to appear in 13 games for Sky Blue. She recorded 1,047 minutes, 12 starts, four goals and one assist.

“If you told me this at the beginning of the year, just knowing the quality and caliber of my class, I wouldn’t believe you,” Dorsey said of being named Rookie of the Year. “Everybody is so talented, competitive and smart in the NWSL. I remember it being a complete honor to play against some of these players.”

It’s natural as a rookie to feel at some point star-struck, and for Dorsey that moment came during her first road game against the Orlando Pride on June 16, where her team fell 3-2.

“Oh my gosh, Marta!” Dorsey said enthusiastically. “Marta came on the field and she was like in the corner and I had to pressure her on the corner. She looked like she was going to meg me and I was literally standing there defending her being like, ‘Okay, no matter what you do, do not get megged!’ I was just so in awe.”

While Dorsey may have been in awe of Marta that night, her performance wasn’t anything short of impressive either. In the 16th minute, Dorsey made an interception on a pass in the midfield. Dorsey’s steal sparked a fast break and sprung in fellow rookie Savannah McCaskill. Dorsey followed the play through and McCaskill played it back to Dorsey who ripped off a shot. Her shot was saved, but the rebound bounced to McCaskill, who finished the equalizing goal.

Dorsey finished that game with three shots, one key pass and five interceptions.

Five games into her rookie season, Dorsey scored her first professional goal against the Chicago Red Stars on July 7. In the 73rd minute, Sky Blue had an impressive team build up, starting from the backline and weaving all the way up to forward Carli Lloyd. Lloyd played in Savannah McCaskillwho slipped in a one-time flick pass to Dorsey, running into the box. Dorsey slid and finished with her right foot. Dorsey finished that game with three shots, all on target.

“Going to the cheesecake factory with Amandine Pierre-Louis and Shea [Groom] to get cheesecake is probably my favorite memory — that, and scoring my first professional goal … that was pretty exciting!”

Dorsey’s other favorite memory was when Sky Blue finally earned their first win of the season in their final game of the year, a 1-0 home win over the Orlando Pride.

“When we won that game, I think everybody was just at a loss for words,” Dorsey said. “It was a sigh of relief for the girls knowing how hard that was for everybody and it was just really great to celebrate with each other because we knew how much it meant.”

Sky Blue finished the season in last place with an overall record of 1-17-6 and nine points. Dorsey wasn’t shy to say that the season was rough, but one thing that helped her through it all was her host family. Dorsey lived with her former Duke teammate Schuyler DeBree’s family in New Jersey during the season.

“They are incredible. They kept my head above water and kept me focused. It was just a lot of the parental love I was needing at that point of my life.” Dorsey also added that their salmon, broccoli, brussels sprouts and rice dinner was one-of-a-kind.

On her team, Dorsey said everyone had a different person they would turn to during the season. “I definitely looked to Sarah Killion, Shea Groom, Rocky [Raquel Rodriguez] and Domi Richardson – those four girls I looked up to and admired. They felt like a good steady presence to me this season.”

From an icy overnight drive to Philadelphia in January, to months balancing school and training, to finally earning a professional contract and going on to win Rookie of the Year – it’s fair to say that it’s been quite the ride for Dorsey.

Canada, U.S. qualify for 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup

Canada and the United States will play in the final of the Concacaf Women's Championship on Wednesday

Canada and the United States dominated on Sunday to qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. (Photo credit: Brad Smith/isiphotos.com)

Canada and the United States qualified for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup with wins in the Concacaf Women’s Championship semifinals on Sunday in Frisco, Texas. They’ll now meet on Wednesday night in the CWC final (8 p.m. ET on FS1).

Canada topped Panama 7-0 and the United States beat Jamaica 6-0.

“You can’t take it for granted. Qualifying in Concacaf is getting more and more difficult and you’re seeing different teams reaching semifinals,” Canada’s Christine Sinclair told Fox Sports’ Alex Curry after the game. “It never gets old.”

It feels great. We never took any game for granted. We knew going in that Jamaica was going to be a handful and they were,” Sauerbrunn told Curry after the U.S. win. “We’re happy with a clean sheet and we’re just thrilled to be going to France.”

Panama and Jamaica, who have never appeared in the World Cup, will meet in the third place game on Wednesday (5 p.m. ET on FS2), with the winner also qualifying for next summer’s tournament. The loser will have to take on Argentina in a home-and-away playoff for a spot in France.

Seventeen of 24 countries have booked their tickets to France so far: Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China PR, England, France (host nation), Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea Republic, Norway, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, Thailand and the United States.

The United States — who won it all in 2015 — has now qualified for all eight Women’s World Cups, joining Brazil, Germany, Japan, Norway and Sweden as the only teams to qualify for every tournament. Canada has qualified for seven in their history.


Canada 7 | Panama 0

Portland Thorns FC forward Christine Sinclair scored her 176th and 177th international goals to lead Canada to a 7-0 win over Panama on Sunday.

After a frustrating first half as Canada struggled to make the most of their chances, it was Sinclair who came through for Canada, heading home a cross from Manchester City’s Janine Beckie to give Canada the 1-0 lead in the 44th minute.

The goal, and Sinclair’s fiery celebration, seemed to open things up for Canada and they came out flying in the second half.

“They made it difficult in the first half,” Sinclair told Curry. “To get one right before half put us in a great mood in the locker room and we knew we could just keep going.”

After a goal from UCLA’s Jessie Fleming in the 47th minute, Sinclair scored her second of the game in the 49th minute to make it 3-0. The header goal, on an assist from Houston Dash forward Nichelle Prince, who had just subbed into the match, is Sinclair’s 177th international goal. She now is just seven behind former U.S. women’s national team forward Abby Wambach’s all-time record of 184.

Utah Royals FC midfielder Diana Matheson celebrated her 200th cap in style — qualifying for the World Cup, and assisting on Fleming’s goal.

“It’s funny how things work out. Just a random game to have a 200th cap,” Matheson said when speaking with Curry after the game. “It was really all about the result today. And now I think I’ll go enjoy it for the evening, and then obviously we have a final to play so we’re going to focus back on that.”

Beckie scored to make it 4-0 in the 58th minute and then Washington Spirit midfielder Rebecca Quinn made it 5-0 in the 63rd.

Shortly after entering the match in the 68th minute, Seattle Reign FC forward Adriana Leon scored back-to-back goals, her fifth and sixth goals of the tournament, to seal the 7-0 win. Prince, who made an immediate impact after subbing in at halftime, assisted on both goals.

Leon’s first came in the 76th minute as Prince passed up a shot on goal to dish it to Leon. The second came in the 78th, as Prince passed to Leon, who jumped up and volleyed it with her right shin into the back of the net.

Farissa Córdoba started in goal for Panama as Yenith Bailey, who starred for Panama in the group stage, was rested due to a shoulder injury.


United States 6 | Jamaica 0

The United States wasted no time getting on the scoreboard on Wednesday night vs. Jamaica, scoring in the second minute and going on to win 6-0.

Tobin Heath scored just 101 seconds into the match, cleaning up the rebound after a hard shot from her Thorns teammate Lindsey Horan.

The U.S. doubled their lead in the 15th minute, after a stunning goal from Reign forward Megan Rapinoe, assisted by Courage defender Abby Dahlkemper. Dahlkemper floated a 40-yard long ball across the field over Jamaica’s entire team to Rapinoe on the left wing. Rapinoe dribbled into the box and roofed it past Jamaica goalkeeper Sydney Schneider near post with her left foot to make it 2-0.

Red Stars defender Julie Ertz made it 3-0 in the 21st minute, heading home a cross from Crystal Dunn.

Heath finished a perfect pass from Horan to make it 4-0 in the 29th minute.

Rapinoe and Pride forward Alex Morgan connected in 33rd minute to give the U.S. a 5-0 lead.

Morgan converted a penalty kick in the 84th minute after being fouled in the box to make it 6-0. Morgan now has 96 international goals, 16 in 2018, and 23 in her last 23 games. Morgan is tied with Leon for the tournament lead in goals with six.

“Having this feeling and thought in the back of our minds for the last two years — it’s just great to actually qualify and now talk about the road to France and the road to the World Cup,” Morgan said on Fox Sports after the game. “It’s a great feeling tonight to qualify.”

 

Concacaf Women’s Championship semifinals schedule: Canada vs. Panama, U.S. vs. Jamaica

The top three teams will qualify for the World Cup and the fourth-place team will advance to a play-off vs. Argentina

Canada and the United States are in the semifinals of the Concacaf Women's Championship. (Photo credit: Canada Soccer/Flickr and Brad Smith/isiphotos.com)

Canada, Jamaica, Panama and the United States are set for Sunday’s semifinals of the Concacaf Women’s Championship, the qualifying tournament for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France.

First, it’ll be Canada vs. Panama (Sunday, 5 p.m. ET on FS1) and then United States vs. Jamaica (Sunday, 8 p.m. ET on FS1) at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas. The third-place game and the final will take place on Wednesday, also in Frisco. All games will be broadcast and streamed by FOX Sports.

The winner of each semifinal game will clinch a spot in France and the winner of the third-place game will also clinch a World Cup berth. The fourth-place finisher will head to a home-and-away playoff with Argentina for a spot in next summer’s tournament.

Canada and the United States both finished at the top of their groups with 3-0 records to advance to the semifinals of this tournament. Panama and Jamaica have never made the World Cup in their history. The United States has appeared in all seven prior tournaments and Canada has appeared in six.

In the semifinals, if the score is tied at the end of regulation, the game will go straight to penalty kicks. In the third place game and the final, if the score is tied at the end of regulation, the game will go to extra time and then penalty kicks. [Concacaf Women’s Championship rules]

For coverage of the Concacaf Women’s Championship, follow the NWSL on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Use the hashtag #CWC to follow the tournament.


NWSL players on Concacaf Women’s Championship rosters:

Canada: Lindsay Agnew (Houston Dash), Allysha Chapman (Houston Dash), Shelina Zadorsky (Orlando Pride), Rebecca Quinn (Washington Spirit), Diana Matheson (Utah Royals FC), Adriana Leon (Seattle Reign FC), Nichelle Prince (Houston Dash), Christine Sinclair (Portland Thorns FC), Kailen Sheridan (Sky Blue FC)

United States: Ashlyn Harris (Orlando Pride), Alyssa Naeher (Chicago Red Stars), Abby Dahlkemper (North Carolina Courage), Crystal Dunn (North Carolina Courage), Kelley O’Hara (Utah Royals FC), Becky Sauerbrunn (Utah Royals FC), Casey Short (Chicago Red Stars), Emily Sonnett (Portland Thorns FC), Morgan Brian (Chicago Red Stars), Julie Ertz (Chicago Red Stars), Lindsey Horan (Portland Thorns FC;), Rose Lavelle (Washington Spirit), Samantha Mewis (North Carolina Courage), Tobin Heath (Portland Thorns FC), Carli Lloyd (Sky Blue FC), Alex Morgan (Orlando Pride), Christen Press (Utah Royals FC), Mallory Pugh (Washington Spirit), Megan Rapinoe (Seattle Reign FC)


October 14

Toyota Stadium; Frisco, Texas

Canada vs. Panama | 5 p.m. ET | FS1
United States vs. Jamaica | 8 p.m. ET | FS1

 

October 17

Toyota Stadium; Frisco, Texas

Third-place match | 5 p.m. ET| FS2
Championship | 8 p.m. ET| FS1

 


Ticket info via U.S. Soccer:

FRISCO, TEXAS

Tickets for the semifinals, Third-Place Match and the Championship Game at the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship are currently on sale through ussoccer.com, by phone at 1-855-492-8053 and at the Toyota Stadium Ticket Office.

Groups of 20 or more can order directly at ussoccer.com.

Coaches Circle and Presidents Circle members supporting the U.S. Soccer Development Fund can receive individual customer support and concierge services for their ticketing needs. Click here or contact circles@ussoccer.org for more information.

Canada, Jamaica advance to Concacaf Women’s Championship semifinals; Costa Rica eliminated

Christine Sinclair scored her 175th international goal

Christine Sinclair scored her 175th international goal. (Photo credit: Canada Socer)

Canada capped off the group stage at the Concacaf Women’s Championship with a 3-1 win over Costa Rica on Thursday night at H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas.

Canada finished Group B play in first place, and will play Panama on Sunday at 5 p.m. ET on FS1. Panama earned second-place in Group A after a 2-0 upset over Mexico on Wednesday. At 8 p.m. ET on FS1, the United States, who finished in first-place in Group A, will play Jamaica, the second-place team from Group B. 

Portland Thorns FC forward Christine Sinclair scored her 175th international goal in the win and Houston Dash forward Nichelle Prince also chipped in one of her own. Former Sky Blue FC forward Janine Beckie opened up the scoring for Canada.

Canada got on the board early thanks to a 26th minute goal from Beckie. Beckie was played in with a textbook pass from Jessie Fleming and tapped it home to make it 1-0.

Costa Rica goalkeeper Daniela Vega made two errors that led to Canada goals in the first half. First it was a bobble that Beckie finished off, and then in the 40th minute, Prince added her third goal of the tournament to extend Canada’s lead by two.

In the second half, Houston Dash defender Alysha Chapman played in Sinclair who was able to rock one past Vega to give Canada the 3-0 lead. Sinclair now has 175 international goals and needs just 10 more goals to beat the international goals scored record held by former USWNT forward Abby Wambach.

Gloriana Villalobos pulled one back for Costa Rica in the 73rd minute.

Cuba 0 | Jamaica 9

Jamaica scored nine times against Cuba to secure a second-place finish in Group B with six points. Jody Brown had a hat trick performance, scoring in the 25th, 38th and 71st minute.

 

U.S., Panama advance to Concacaf Women’s Championship semifinals; Mexico eliminated

The United States and Panama are headed to the semifinals of the tournament

The United States and Panama are heading to Frisco, Texas, for the semifinals of the Concacaf Women's Championship. (Photo credit: Brad Smith/isiphotos.com)

The United States finished off the group stage at the Concacaf Women’s Championship with a 7-0 win over Trinidad & Tobago on a rainy Wednesday night at Sahlen’s Stadium at WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary, North Carolina.

The United States finished Group A action in first place, and will play the second-place team from Group B (likely either Costa Rica or Jamaica) in the semifinals on Sunday in Frisco, Texas. That game will take place at 8 p.m. ET and will be televised on FS1. Panama, after a 2-0 upset of Mexico on Wednesday, finished in second place, and will play the winner of Group B (likely Canada). That game will air live at 5 p.m. ET on FS1. Mexico and Trinidad & Tobago have been eliminated.

The top two teams in each group advance to the semifinals, which assures at least a play-off vs. Argentina for a World Cup berth. A win in the semifinals or in the third place game qualifies each team for the World Cup. The group stage of the tournament concludes Thursday with Cuba vs. Jamaica and Costa Rica vs. Canada in Group B. Canada leads Group B, with Costa Rica in second and Jamaica close behind in third.

Orlando Pride Alex Morgan scored her first goal of the game in the ninth minute, flicking in a cross from Portland Thorns FC forward Tobin Heath.

For awhile after that it seemed like it might be frustrating night for the U.S., as a number of shots hit the woodwork and Trinidad & Tobago goalkeeper Saundra Baron made nine saves in the first half.

But then the game broke open at the end of the first half when the U.S. scored three goals in four minutes. Washington Spirit midfielder Rose Lavelle scored in the 41st and 43rd minutes. First, a left-footed shot from distance.

Then, a finish in the box for her first career brace.

In the 45th, it was the North Carolina Courage’s Crystal Dunn’s turn to score from outside the box.

It was more of the same in the second half for the U.S. with Portland Thorns FC Lindsey Horan dialing up a goal from distance. Chicago Red Stars midfielder Julie Ertz had her shot blocked, and the rebound fell to Horan.

Morgan finished her brace in the 50th minute with a shot off the post. It’s Morgan’s 14th goal for the USWNT in 2018. She now has 21 goals in her last 22 USWNT games, and 94 international goals.

Heath made it 7-0 in the 59th minute, finishing off an inch-perfect pass from Seattle Reign FC forward Megan Rapinoe.

The United States finished off Group A action with three wins, outscoring opponents 18-0, and needing just one big save from Orlando Pride goalkeeper Ashlyn Harris in their second game to keep their defensive record perfect. Chicago Red Stars goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher started the first and third group stage games and picked up clean sheets in both.

 

Panama 2 | Mexico 0

Panama advanced to the semifinals of the Concacaf Women’s Championship with a 2-0 win over Mexico in the first game on Wednesday night. The result means that Mexico will miss out on the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France next summer.

Mexico needed all three points to move on to the semifinals, and Panama just a draw, but Panama got the win with a strong defensive performance and two second half goals.

Karla Riley scored on a volley for Panama in the 47th minute, but it was largely the Yenith Bailey show once again for Panama. The 17-year-old goalkeeper, who impressed in performances vs. Trinidad & Tobago and the United States, made fives saves to earn the shutout on Wednesday night.

Bailey’s biggest save came at the end of the first half, diving to her left to stop a penalty kick by Charlyn Corral after a handball in the box.

Katie Johnson (Sky Blue FC) and Christina Murillo (Chicago Red Stars) started for Mexico. Johnson subbed off in the 76th minute.

Bailey also came off her line a number of times for catches and clearances. In the 73rd minute, she went to the ground to beat Johnson to a long ball played over the top. In the 78th minute, she made a catch in traffic to deny Monica Ocampo a header opportunity in the box.

Lineth Cedeño sealed the win with a goal in the 85th minute.

 

Switzerland and the Netherlands advance to final play-off for UEFA’s final World Cup berth

Switzerland and the Netherlands will meet in a home-and-away series in November for the final spot

Ana Crnogorčević and Switzerland are still in contention for UEFA's final World Cup spot. (Photo credit: Craig Mitchelldyer/isiphotos.com)

Switzerland and the Netherlands have advanced to the finals of the UEFA play-offs for the federation’s final spot in the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup. The home-and-away series will take place between November 5 and 13.

Switzerland and Portland Thorns FC’s Ana Crnogorčević moved past Belgium with a pair of draws, 1-1 at home on Tuesday, and a 2-2 hard-fought road draw on Friday that gave Switzerland the road goals edge they needed to win the semifinal play-off.

The Netherlands advanced past Seattle Reign FC defender Theresa Nielsen and Denmark with a 2-0 home win on Friday and a 2-1 road win on Tuesday. The matchup was a rematch of the 2017 Euro final, also won by the Netherlands.

Fifteen of 24 countries have booked their tickets to France so far: Australia, Brazil, Chile, China PR, England, France (host nation), Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea Republic, Norway, Scotland, Spain, Sweden and Thailand. 

 

 

Leon scores four as Canada picks up 12-0 win over Cuba; Jamaica beats Costa Rica 1-0

Canada is comfortably in first place in Group B

Seattle Reign FC forward Adriana Leon prior to a Canada game earlier this year. (Photo credit: Canada Soccer/Flickr)

Canada got their second win of the Concacaf Women’s Championship on Monday night, 12-0 over Cuba at H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas.

With Monday’s results, Canada is in first place in Group B. Costa Rica is in second place and Jamaica is close behind in third, following Jamaica’s big win over Costa Rica earlier Monday. Jamaica will next face Cuba on Wednesday, while Costa Rica will take on Canada on the final group stage day — as Jamaica and Costa Rica compete for the second semifinal spot out of Group B.

Seattle Reign FC forward Adriana Leon bagged a brace in the first 23 minutes and then added two more in the second half. She now has 12 international goals in her career. She added an assist on 17-year-old Jordyn Huitema’s first half goal as Canada dominated from the start to finish. Huitema and Leon each scored four goals in the win.

Sky Blue FC goalkeeper Kailen Sheridan started in goal for Canada, her sixth international appearance. Sheridan was a late add to the roster after an injury to Erin McLeod. She was not called on to make a save in the shutout.

Sheridan was joined in the starting lineup by Leon, Rebecca Quinn (Washington Spirit), Lindsay Agnew (Houston Dash) and Shelina Zadorsky (Orlando Pride), as Canada made seven changes from the starting XI that opened the tournament. Christine Sinclair (Portland Thorns FC) subbed on at halftime.

Leon’s first goal came in the 11th minute, when Matheson played a square ball to Leon, open at the top of the six-yard box. Leon calmly slotted it in with her left foot for the game’s opening goal.

Canada doubled their lead in the 13th minute on a header goal from Huitema, and a header assist from Quinn.

Leon made it 3-0 in the 23rd minute and then Deanne Rose scored two minutes later to make it 5-0. Leon then assisted on the fifth and final goal of the first half as Huitema scored her second of the game in the 37th minute.

In addition to Leon and Huitema’s success, Matheson was active throughout the match. In the 15th minute, her long-distance strike was just tipped off the crossbar by Cuba goalkeeper Lucylena Martinez.

Canada picked up the second half right where they left off, with a 52nd minute goal from Huitema to complete her hat trick. It’s the first international hat trick for Huitema.

Leon made it 7-0 in the 55th minute, completing her hat trick with a right-footed near post finish.

Quinn scored her fourth international goal in the 56th minute on a corner kick after Matheson had a shot blocked out for a corner. As Cuba tried to clear it, Quinn picked up the loose ball, spun around and looped it into the upper left-hand corner of the goal to make it 8-0. Leon made it 9-0 with her fourth of the night in the 59th minute.

Sinclair made it 10-0 in the 63rd minute with her 174th international goal. After what looked to be a handball in the box by Cuba, Sinclair picked up the rebound and cooly slotted it home with her right foot.

Sinclair passed up a chance at another goal in the 71st minute, dishing to Huitema to set up Huitema’s fourth goal of the night to make it 11-0. Sinclair had another shot saved by Martinez in the 80th minute, as she searched for another goal to add to her tally as she chases Abby Wambach’s record of 184.

Matheson finally got a goal of her own in the 72nd minute, after a darting run into the box to finish off an assist from Sophie Schmidt to put the score at 12-0.

Zadorsky nearly made it 13-0 late with a shot from outside the box in the 86th minute, but Martinez made a stellar save, diving low and to her right, to deny the defender a goal at the near post.

 

Jamaica 1 | Costa Rica 0

In Monday’s first game, Jamaica came away with a huge win, 1-0 over Costa Rica.

Khadija Shaw (University of Tennessee) scored the game’s only goal in the 46th minute.

Jamaica goalkeeper Sydney Schneider (University of North Carolina) made five saves in the win. In the 53rd minute she stopped Sky Blue FC midfielder Raquel Rodriguez’s point-blank shot to preserve the clean sheet.

Costa Rica had an equalizing goal from Priscilla Chinchilla in the 56th minute called back controversially. It seemed that the ball was ruled to have been in Schneider’s possession when Chinchilla scored it, but replays appeared to show otherwise.

Five NWSL players nominated for 2018 Women’s Ballon d’Or

Horan, Kerr, Marta, Rapinoe and Sinclair are on the shortlist for the inaugural award

Five NWSL players have been nominated for the 2018 Women’s Ballon d’Or, awarded by France Football magazine, which will be presented on December 3 in Paris. It’s the first time the award will be presented to a women’s player.

Lindsey Horan (Portland Thorns FC/United States), Sam Kerr (Chicago Red Stars/Australia), Marta (Orlando Pride/Brazil), Megan Rapinoe (Seattle Reign FC/United States) and Christine Sinclair (Portland Thorns FC/Canada) are among the 15 nominees.

They are joined by: Lucy Bronze (Olympique Lyon/England), Pernille Harder (VfL Wolfsburg/Denmark), Ada Hegerberg (Olympique Lyon), Amandine Henry (Olympique Lyon/France), Fran Kirby (Chelsea/England), Saki Kumagai (Olympique Lyon/Japan), Amel Majri (Olympique Lyon/France), Dzsenifer Marozsán (Olympique Lyon/Germany), Lieke Martens (FC Barcelona/Netherlands) and Wendie Renard (Olympique Lyon/France).

The Ballon d’Or has been around since 1956, but only awarded to men’s players prior to this year. From 2010 to 2015, it was merged with FIFA’s World Player of the Year award for men, before FIFA’s The Best was established 2016 and the Ballon D’Or went back to being a separate award.

France Football says the award is voted on by select journalists, with one representative per country. It also says that the award is based on three main criteria: individual and team performance during the year, player talent and fair play, and the player’s career. [Details and rules]

This season in the NWSL, Horan, Kerr and Rapinoe were finalists for the NWSL MVP award, which was won by Horan. The three, as well as Sinclair, also made the 2018 NWSL Playoffs, with Horan and Sinclair reaching the NWSL Championship with Portland Thorns FC before falling to the North Carolina Courage in the final. Kerr won the Golden Boot, finishing as the league’s top scorer. Last month, Marta was named 2018 FIFA The Best Women’s Player.

United States, Mexico pick up wins on second day of Group A play

The United States punch their ticket to the semifinal

Carli Lloyd scores a hat trick, Christen Press scored and had two assists. (Photo credit: Brad Smith/isiphotos.com)

The United States national team played their second match at the Concacaf Women’s Championship on Sunday, and walked away with a 5-0 statement win over Panama at Sahlen’s Stadium at WakeMed Soccer Park, home of the North Carolina Courage. Sky Blue FC forward Carli Lloyd celebrated her 261st cap by scoring a hat trick.

Mexico and Trinidad & Tobago featured in the nightcap, and Mexico earned the 4-1 result. With the victory, the U.S. are through to the semifinals. Sky Blue FC’s Katie Johnson scored for Mexico.

The U.S. had nine changes to their lineup from their 6-0 win over Mexico last Thursday. All of the available subs against Mexico started on Sunday night – with only Chicago Red Stars Julie Ertz and North Carolina Courage defender Abby Dahlkemper repeating as starters.

It didn’t take long for the U.S. to open scoring. In the fifth minute, Utah Royals FC forward Christen Press took a corner kick and found the head of North Carolina Courage midfielder Sam Mewis. Mewis broke free and directed a flick header into the right corner of the net for the 1-0 lead. This was Mewis’ fifth game this year for the U.S. and she earned her second start. Press picked up her 105th cap on Sunday.

In the 23rd minute, Press earned her second assist off of another corner kick. Press played the ball to the back post where Lloyd was crashing free. Lloyd headed it home to make it 2-0 and score her 103rd career goal.

Just minutes later, Lloyd put on a clinic beating three of Panama’s defenders and finishing far post for her 104th career goal. The goal started with a driven ball from Chicago Red Stars Casey Short (in her first World Cup Qualifying appearance) out of the back. Short found the foot of Lloyd with her back towards the goal. Lloyd managed to turn, face up, and beat the trio of defenders with impressive individual work.

Before the half, Press added a goal to her two-assist performance. Press was able to break free with a penetrating ball played in from Dahlkemper. Press beat both of Panana’s center backs with her pace and then faked out the goalkeeper Yenith Bailey to the left and finished with her right foot to make it 4-0.

Washington Spirit midfielder Rose Lavelle came into the game at the start of the second half for Ertz and immediately contributed. Lavelle took a free kick for the U.S. on the right side of the pitch just outside the box. Lavelle played in a well-weighted chip ball into the stride of Lloyd who finished it with her head to seal the game at 5-0.

The only other substitution for the U.S. was in the 77th minute when Portland Thorns FC midfielder Lindsey Horan entered the game for Dahlkemper.

The U.S. improve their record this year to 13-0-2.

The United States starting lineup: Ashlyn Harris (Orlando Pride), Emily Sonnett (Portland Thorns FC), Abby Dahlkemper (North Carolina Courage), Hailie Mace, Casey Short (Chicago Red Stars), Julie Ertz (Chicago Red Stars), Morgan Brian (Chicago Red Stars), Samantha Mewis (North Carolina Courage), Mallory Pugh Washington Spirit), Carli Lloyd (Sky Blue FC), Christen Press (Utah Royals FC)


Mexico 4  | Trinidad & Tobago 1

Mexico’s 4-1 victory helped punch the U.S. through to the semifinals. Christina Murillo (Chicago Red Stars) and Katie Johnson (Sky Blue FC) both earned starts against Trinidad & Tobago. Johnson scored in the second half to pull back the lead and proved the eventual game-winner.


The tournament continues Monday from Edinburg, Texas with Jamaica vs. Costa Rica and Cuba vs. Canada. [Full Schedule]

The top three teams will automatically qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France. The fourth-place finisher will head to a home-and-away playoff with Argentina for a spot in next summer’s tournament.

Prince scores twice as Canada opens up World Cup qualifying with 2-0 win over Jamaica

The tournament continues Sunday

Nichelle Prince in action for Canada in September. (Photo credit: Canada Soccer/Flickr)

Canada opened its campaign at the Concacaf Women’s Championship on Friday night with a 2-0 win over  Jamaica at H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas. The tournament, Concacaf’s qualifying tournament for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France, takes place from October 4-17.

Canada is in second place in Group B standings with the win, behind Costa Rica, who routed Cuba 8-0 in Friday’s first game.

Houston Dash forward Nichelle Prince scored twice to give Canada the win.

Prince’s first goal came in the 33rd minute. As Jamaica tried to clear a corner kick taken by former Sky Blue FC forward Janine Beckie, Canada served the ball back into the box. The ball bounced off Jamaica defender Dominique Bond-Flasza and to Prince, who slammed it past goalkeeper Sydney Schneider with her right foot to give Canada the 1-0 lead.

Five NWSL players were in the starting lineup for Canada: Shelina Zadorsky (Orlando Pride), Allysha Chapman (Houston Dash), Rebecca Quinn (Washington Spirit), Nichelle Prince (Houston Dash) and Christine Sinclair (Portland Thorns FC). Adriana Leon (Seattle Reign FC) subbed on in the 66th minute. Utah Royals FC midfielder Diana Matheson entered in the 74th minute.

Prince scored her second goal in the 79th minute after a solid build-up through the center of the field. Matheson passed it to Leon, who flicked a pass to Prince, even with Jamaica’s backline. Prince dribbled into the box and around her defender, slotting it past Schneider for the 2-0 lead.

Sinclair came into the game sitting on 173 international goals, just 11 behind behind former U.S. women’s national team forward Abby Wambach’s all-time record of 184, but could not find the back of the net. She took six total shots, one on target.

It’s Canada’s first time in the tournament since winning it in 2010. As 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup hosts, they did not participate in the 2014 tournament.

The tournament continues Sunday with Group A action — Panama vs. Mexico and Trinidad & Tobago vs. United States. Group B continues Monday with Jamaica vs. Costa Rica and Cuba vs. Canada. [Full Schedule]

The top three teams will automatically qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France. The fourth-place finisher will head to a home-and-away playoff with Argentina for a spot in next summer’s tournament.


Costa Rica 8 | Cuba 0

Costa Rica opened up their tournament with an 8-0 win over Cuba on Friday.

Costa Rica finished second at this tournament  in 2014, qualifying for their first-ever Women’s World Cup.

Shirley Cruz, Priscilla Chinchilla and María Barrantes each scored twice and Costa Rica added goals from Fabiola Sánchez and Melissa Herrera in the win.

Sky Blue FC’s Raquel Rodriguez started for Costa Rica, and played the first 58 minutes of the match. Though the score favored Costa Rica, it was a frustrating game for Rodriguez, who had four shots on goal saved by Cuba goalkeeper Katherine Montesino.

Group B continues Monday with Jamaica vs. Costa Rica and Cuba vs. Canada.

UEFA play-offs schedule & results; Schedule of NWSL players on international duty

Denmark and Switzerland are among the teams in the UEFA World Cup qualifying playoffs

An overview of how to keep up with and follow the players of the NWSL taking part in international games in October. This page will be updated with results and highlights as they become available. Live scores are available on FIFA.com.

Qualifiers for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup will take place this month for Concacaf and UEFA. Concacaf will feature NWSL players representing Canada, Costa Rica, Mexico and the United States. More info on that tournament can be found here.

Switzerland and the Netherlands have advanced to the finals of the UEFA play-offs for the federation’s final spot in the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup. The home-and-away series will take place between November 5 and 13.

Switzerland and Portland Thorns FC’s Ana Crnogorčević moved past Belgium with a pair of draws, 1-1 at home on Tuesday, and a 2-2 hard-fought road draw on Friday that gave Switzerland the road goals edge they needed to win the semifinal play-off. The Netherlands advanced past Seattle Reign FC defender Theresa Nielsen and Denmark with a 2-0 home win on Friday and a 2-1 road win on Tuesday. The matchup was a rematch of the 2017 Euro final, also won by the Netherlands.

Schedule | More Info

Friday, October 5:

Netherlands 2, Denmark 0 | Match Report

Belgium 2, Switzerland 2 | Match Report

Tuesday, October 9:

Denmark 1, Netherlands 2 | Match Report

Switzerland 1, Belgium 1 | Match Report


Additionally, several friendlies will take place over the next week featuring NWSL players. Countries are listed in alphabetical order.

 

Australia

Schedule

NWSL players on the roster:

Ellie Carpenter (Portland Thorns FC), Steph Catley (Seattle Reign FC), Caitlin Foord (Portland Thorns FC), Elise Kellond-Knight (Seattle Reign FC), Clare Polkinghorne (Houston Dash), Kyah Simon (Houston Dash) [Full Roster]


Brazil

Schedule

NWSL players on the roster:

Monica (Orlando Pride), Poliana (Orlando Pride), Andressinha (Portland Thorns FC), Camila (Orlando Pride), Marta (Orlando Pride), Debinha (North Carolina Courage) [Roster announcement | Roster update]


England

Schedule

NWSL players on the roster:

Rachel Daly (Houston Dash). Jodie Taylor (Seattle Reign FC) has withdrawn from the roster due to injury. [Full Roster]


South Africa

Schedule

NWSL players on the roster:

Thembi Kgatlana (Houston Dash), Linda Motlhalo (Houston Dash), as well as former Houston Dash defender Janine Van Wyk. [Full Roster]

U.S. opens World Cup qualifying with 6-0 win over Mexico

The United States is in first place in Group A

The United States opened the Concacaf Women’s Championship on Thursday with a 6-0 win over Mexico, at Sahlen’s Stadium at WakeMed Soccer Park, home of the North Carolina Courage. The tournament, Concacaf’s qualifying tournament for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France, takes place from October 4-17.

After the win, the United States sits on top of Group A. Panama is in second place after their 3-0 win over Trinidad & Tobago.

Seattle Reign FC forward Megan Rapinoe wore the captain’s armband for the second time in her career, and she celebrated with a brace on Thursday night. She first wore the armband on May 10, 2015 vs. Ireland.

Rapinoe wasted no time in finding the back of the net, scoring her 39th international goal in just the third minute. After a misclear in the box by Mexico, Lindsey Horan ran the ball down before Mexico goalkeeper Bianca Henninger could get to it. Horan sent it into the middle of the box and Rapinoe tapped it home.

The game marked Horan’s first with the USWNT since being named 2018 NWSL MVP last month following her stellar season for Portland Thorns FC and she recorded two assists for the U.S. on Thursday night.

The U.S. had a few more chances in the first half, but the game stayed 1-0. Rose Lavelle hit the post in the 26th minute. Tobin Heath‘s cross forced a defender clearance near the goal line in the 32nd minute. Horan had two strong shots on goal blocked in the 34th and 35th minutes. Henninger came up big in the 37th minute with a kick save to deny Rapinoe a goal.

Henninger (Houston Dash) started in goal for Mexico, with Katie Johnson (Sky Blue FC) and Christina Murillo (Chicago Red Stars) as available subs. Johnson subbed on in the 60th minute and Murillo came on in the 78th minute.

But while the first half ended just 1-0, the second half was all United States as they broke the game open.

“We needed to clean up a little bit,” Rapinoe told Fox Sports’ Alex Curry after the game. “Not as much movement off the ball as we would’ve wanted [in the first half]. I think we started to do that better in the second half and it just opens up so much more.”

The United States got their second goal early in the second half after Horan was fouled in the final third. Rapinoe took the free kick, sending it into the box, with the rebound bouncing off the crossbar. The ball then bounced back into the six-yard box. Horan tapped it to Julie Ertz, who knocked it in to make it 2-0.

Alex Morgan scored her first goal of the night in the 57th minute. Morgan headed in a Rapinoe corner kick to make it 3-0.

Tobin Heath made it 4-0 in the 61st minute, heading home a cross from Crystal Dunn.

Lavelle and Kelley O’Hara both subbed out in the 66th minute, as the pair continue to work their way back to full fitness following injuries. They were replaced by Carli Lloyd (Sky Blue FC) and Emily Sonnett (Portland Thorns FC), respectively. Mallory Pugh (Washington Spirit) replaced Heath in the 77th minute.

Rapinoe made it 5-0 in the 70th minute after some chaos in the box following a Heath corner kick. Horan won the ball in the air, and Lloyd went down in a collision with Henniger. The loose ball bounced to Rapinoe, standing alone in the box, and she tapped it for her second goal of the game and 40th of her international career.

Becky Sauerbrunn sprung into the attack and earned an assist in the 80th minute, passing up a shot and dishing to Morgan, who finished for her second goal of the night. Morgan now has 92 international goals, and has scored 19 goals in her last 21 USWNT games.

The United States came into the match 27-1 all-time in World Cup qualifying, with the only loss coming to Mexico in 2010. That 2-1 loss sent the United States to the play-off where they beat Italy for the final spot in the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup. The United States had outscored opponents 158-5 in those 28 games, before Thursday night’s win.

The United States starting line-up: Alyssa Naeher (Chicago Red Stars), Kelley O’Hara (Utah Royals FC), Abby Dahlkemper (North Carolina Courage), Becky Sauerbrunn (Utah Royals FC), Crystal Dunn (North Carolina Courage), Julie Ertz (Chicago Red Stars), Rose Lavelle (Washington Spirit), Lindsey Horan (Portland Thorns FC), Tobin Heath (Portland Thorns FC), Alex Morgan (Orlando Pride) and Megan Rapinoe (Seattle Reign FC).

The tournament continues Friday with Group B action from Edinburg, Texas, with Costa Rica vs. Cuba and Canada vs. Jamaica. [Full Schedule]

The top three teams will automatically qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France. The fourth-place finisher will head to a home-and-away playoff with Argentina for a spot in next summer’s tournament.

 

Trinidad & Tobago 0 | Panama 3

In the first game of the tournament, Panama beat Trinidad & Tobago 3-0 on goals from Kenia Rangel, Marta Cox and Erika Hernández. Yenith Bailey made seven saves to earn the clean sheet for Panama. [Match Report]

The game marked the first in this tournament for Panama since 2006, and they earned the win over Trinidad & Tobago, who finished fourth in 2015.

Group A continues Sunday. Panama will face the United States and Trinidad & Tobago will take on Mexico.

 

Concacaf Women’s Championship begins Thursday

Thirty-two NWSL players feature on the rosters for Canada, Costa Rica, Mexico and the United States

Canada, Costa Rica, Mexico and the United States are all competing in the Concacaf Women’s Championship this month. (Photo credits: Canada Soccer/Flickr and isiphotos.com)

The Concacaf Women’s Championship begins Thursday with Trinidad & Tobago vs. Panama and United States vs. Mexico in Cary, North Carolina. The tournament, Concacaf’s qualifying tournament for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France, will take place October 4-17. After Thursday’s Group A games, Group B gets underway in Edinburg, Texas, with Costa Rica vs. Cuba and Canada vs. Jamaica.

Thirty-two NWSL players feature on the rosters for Canada, Costa Rica, Mexico and the United States in the tournament. [Full Rosters] Sportsnet in Canada reported on Wednesday that Sky Blue FC goalkeeper Kailen Sheridan has been added to the roster for Canada following an injury to Erin McLeod. [Read more]

The top three teams will automatically qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France. The fourth-place finisher will head to a home-and-away playoff with Argentina for a spot in next summer’s tournament. Canada and the United States are the only countries to have won this tournament. Canada, Costa Rica, Mexico and the United States qualified out of Concacaf for the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup. [Tournament History]

Fifteen of 24 countries have booked their tickets to France so far: Australia, Brazil, Chile, China PR, England, France (host nation), Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea Republic, Norway, Scotland, Spain, Sweden and Thailand. 

All games will be broadcast and streamed by FOX Sports. The full broadcast schedule is listed below.

For coverage of the Concacaf Women’s Championship, follow the NWSL on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Use the hashtag #CWC to follow the tournament.

NWSL players on Concacaf Women’s Championship rosters:

Canada: Lindsay Agnew (Houston Dash), Allysha Chapman (Houston Dash), Shelina Zadorsky (Orlando Pride), Rebecca Quinn (Washington Spirit), Diana Matheson (Utah Royals FC), Adriana Leon (Seattle Reign FC), Nichelle Prince (Houston Dash), Christine Sinclair (Portland Thorns FC), Kailen Sheridan (Sky Blue FC)

Costa Rica: Raquel Rodriguez (Sky Blue FC)

Mexico: Bianca Henninger (Houston Dash), Christina Murillo (Chicago Red Stars), Katie Johnson (Sky Blue FC)

United States: Ashlyn Harris (Orlando Pride), Alyssa Naeher (Chicago Red Stars), Abby Dahlkemper (North Carolina Courage), Crystal Dunn (North Carolina Courage), Kelley O’Hara (Utah Royals FC), Becky Sauerbrunn (Utah Royals FC), Casey Short (Chicago Red Stars), Emily Sonnett (Portland Thorns FC), Morgan Brian (Chicago Red Stars), Julie Ertz (Chicago Red Stars), Lindsey Horan (Portland Thorns FC;), Rose Lavelle (Washington Spirit), Samantha Mewis (North Carolina Courage), Tobin Heath (Portland Thorns FC), Carli Lloyd (Sky Blue FC), Alex Morgan (Orlando Pride), Christen Press (Utah Royals FC), Mallory Pugh (Washington Spirit), Megan Rapinoe (Seattle Reign FC)

Group A of the tournament will feature the United States, Mexico, Trinidad & Tobago and Panama. Group A games will be played at Sahlen’s Stadium at WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary, North Carolina. Group B will feature Canada, Jamaica, Costa Rica and Cuba. Group B games will take place at H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas. The semifinals, third-place game and championship games will be held at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas.


Schedule:

Match order/networks are subject to change

October 4

Sahlen’s Stadium in Cary, North Carolina

Trinidad & Tobago vs. Panama | 5 p.m. ET | FS2

United States vs. Mexico | 7:30 p.m. ET| FS2

 

October 5

H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas

Costa Rica vs. Cuba | 6 p.m. ET| FS2

Canada vs. Jamaica | 8:30 p.m. ET| FS2

 

October 7

Sahlen’s Stadium in Cary, North Carolina

Panama vs. United States | 5 p.m. ET| FS1

Mexico vs. Trinidad & Tobago | 7:30 p.m. ET| FS2

 

October 8

H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas

Jamaica vs. Costa Rica | 6 p.m. ET| FS2

Cuba vs. Canada | 8:30 p.m. ET| FS1

 

October 10

Sahlen’s Stadium in Cary, North Carolina

Panama vs. Mexico | 5 p.m. ET| FS2

Trinidad & Tobago vs. United States | 7:30 p.m. ET| FS2

 

October 11

H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas

Cuba vs. Jamaica | 7:30 p.m. ET| FS2

Costa Rica vs. Canada | 10 p.m. ET| FS1

 

October 14

Toyota Stadium; Frisco, Texas

2nd A vs. 1st B | 5 p.m. ET*| FS1

1st A vs. 2nd B | 8 p.m. ET*| FS1

* Order of semifinal matches may be switched to accommodate broadcasters

 

October 17

Toyota Stadium; Frisco, Texas

Third-place match | 5 p.m. ET| FS2

Championship | 8 p.m. ET| FS1

 


Tournament tie-breakers, via U.S. Soccer:

“Should two or more teams be tied on points at the end of group play, the following tie-breakers will determine advancement:

  • Goal difference in all group matches
  • Greatest number of goals scored in all group matches

If two (2) or more teams are equal on the basis of the above criteria, their rankings shall be determined as follows:

  • Greater number of points scored in matches between the tied teams;
  • Greater goal difference in matches between the tied teams (if more than two teams finish equal on points);
  • Greater number of goals scored in matches among the tied teams (if more than two teams finish equal on points);
  • The lowest number of points based on the number of yellow and red cards in all group matches is considered according to
  • the following additions:
    • First yellow card: plus 1 point
    • Second yellow card/indirect red card: Plus 3 points
    • Direct red card: plus 4 points
    • Yellow card and direct red card: plus 5 points;
    • Drawing of lots by Concacaf
  • Teams get three substitutes each per match
  • In the Semifinal, if the score is tied at the end of regulation time, no extra time will be played. Instead the matches will go straight to kicks from the penalty mark per the Laws of the Game.
  • In the Third-Place and Final match, if the score is tied at the end of regulation time, extra time will be played. If the score is tied at the end of extra time the matches will go straight to kicks from the penalty mark per the Laws of the Game.”

Ticket info via U.S. Soccer:

CARY, N.C.

Tickets for the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship Group A doubleheaders featuring the U.S. Women’s National Team, Mexico, Trinidad & Tobago and Panama on Oct. 4, 7 and 10 in Cary, N.C., are currently on sale through ussoccer.com and by phone at 1-800-745-3000. Tickets will not be sold at the stadium except on the day of each event.

EDINBURG, TEXAS

Tickets for the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship Group B doubleheaders featuring Canada, Jamaica, Costa Rica and Cuba on Oct. 5, 8 and 11 in Edinburg, Texas, go on sale Thursday, Sept. 6, at 10 a.m. CT through ussoccer.com and by phone at 1-800-745-3000. Tickets will not be sold at the stadium except on the day of each event.

FRISCO, TEXAS

Tickets for the semifinals, Third-Place Match and the Championship Game at the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship are currently on sale through ussoccer.com, by phone at 1-855-492-8053 and at the Toyota Stadium Ticket Office.

Groups of 20 or more can order directly at ussoccer.com.

Coaches Circle and Presidents Circle members supporting the U.S. Soccer Development Fund can receive individual customer support and concierge services for their ticketing needs. Click here or contact circles@ussoccer.org for more information.

Field Level: NWSL Championship

A closer look at the 2018 NWSL Championship

The North Carolina Courage celebrate after winning the 2018 NWSL Championship. (Photo credit: John Todd/isiphotos.com)

Take a field level look at the 2018 NWSL Championship from Providence Park in Portland, Oregon. The North Carolina Courage beat Portland Thorns FC 3-0 with two goals from Jessica McDonald and a goal from Debinha.

Hear from McDonald, forward Crystal Dunn, defender Abby Erceg and more.

 

 

No players selected off Re-Entry Wire

The seven players are now discovery eligible

(Photo credit: Jeremy Reper/isiphotos.com)

The NWSL announced on Tuesday that no players were selected off the Re-Entry Wire, as part of the End of Season Process in the league. Teams had from 1 p.m. ET on Monday until 1 p.m. ET on Tuesday to make submissions for players on the wire. The seven players are now discovery eligible.

Players that were available on the Re-Entry Wire, along with their previous teams:

At the end of the season, a club must place a player on the Re-Entry Wire if her contract option was not exercised, no new contract was offered or her contract has expired. That player is then available to be selected by the league’s other clubs.

 

 

NWSL teams exercise contract options, extend contract offers

Roster updates for all nine NWSL teams

The 2018 NWSL offseason is underway. (Photo credit: Howard C. Smith/isiphotos.com)

On Monday, NWSL teams announced which players have had contract options exercised and which players have been extended new contract offers.

Additionally, the league announced the players that are available on the Re-Entry Wire as part of the End of Season Process. Full list and more info.

2019 information for Federation Players will be shared at a later date.

 

Chicago Red Stars

Contract options exercised: Emily Boyd, Morgan Brian, Vanessa DiBernardo, Brooke Elby, Sarah Gorden, Sam Kerr, Christina Murillo, Katie Naughton, Nikki Stanton, Erin Yenney

Extended new contract offers: Danielle Colaprico, Arin Gilliland, Summer Green, Alyssa Mautz, Stephanie McCaffrey, Yuki Nagasato, Michele Vasconcelos, Rosie White

Federation Players: Casey Short (United States), Alyssa Naeher (United States), Julie Ertz (United States)


Houston Dash

Contract options exercised: Amber Brooks, Taylor Comeau, Rachel Daly, Haley Hanson, Bianca Henninger, Sofia Huerta, Kimberly Keever, Thembi Kgatlana, Veronica Latsko, Linda Motlhalo, Kealia Ohai, Clare Polkinghorne, Kyah Simon, Meleana Shim

Extended new contract offers: Lindsay Agnew, Savannah Jordan, Kristie Mewis, Sammy Jo Prudhomme

Placed on Re-Entry Wire: Janine Van Wyk

Federation Players: Jane Campbell (United States), Allysha Chapman (Canada), Nichelle Prince (Canada)


North Carolina Courage

Contract options exercised: Kaleigh Kurtz, Heather O’Reilly, Denise O’Sullivan, Cari Roccaro, Katelyn Rowland, Meredith Speck, McCall Zerboni

Extended new contract offers: Debinha, Elizabeth Eddy, Kristen Hamilton, Jaelene Hinkle, Darian Jenkins, Julie King, Merritt Mathias, Jessica McDonald

New contract: Abby Erceg

Placed on Re-Entry Wire: Yuri Kawamura

Federation Players: Sabrina D’Angelo (Canada), Abby Dahlkemper (United States), Crystal Dunn (United States), Samantha Mewis (United States), Lynn Williams (United States)


Orlando Pride

Contract options exercised: Poliana, Kristen Edmonds, Alanna Kennedy, Ali Krieger, Sydney Leroux, Carson Pickett, Chioma Ubogagu, Emily van Egmond, Marta, Dani Weatherholt 

Extended new contract offers: Danica Evans, Monica, Rachel Hill, Haley Kopmeyer, Camila, Christine Nairn, Toni Pressley

Federation Players: Shelina Zadorsky (Canada), Alex Morgan (United States), Ashlyn Harris (United States)


Portland Thorns FC

Contract options exercised: Adrianna Franch, Britt Eckerstrom, Elizabeth Ball, Ellie Carpener, Kelli Hubly, Meghan Klingenberg, Katherine Reynolds, Celeste Boureille, Angela Salem, Ana Crnogorčević, Caitlin Foord, Tyler Lussi, Hayley Raso, Mallory Weber

Extended new contract offers: Ifeoma Onumonu, Andressinha, Midge Purce, Emily Menges

Federation Players: Tobin Heath (United States), Lindsey Horan (United States), Emily Sonnett (United States), Christine Sinclair (Canada)


Seattle Reign FC

Contract options exercised: Lydia Williams, Michelle Betos, Lauren Barnes, Theresa Nielsen, Christen Westphal, Alyssa Kleiner, Steph Catley, Jessica Fishlock, Elizabeth Addo, Rumi Utsugi, Nahomi Kawasumi, Jodie Taylor, Jaycie Johnson

Extended new contract offers:  Kristen McNabb, Yael Averbuch, Megan Oyster, Morgan Andrews, Bev Yanez, Kiersten Dallstream, Jasmyne Spencer

Federation Players: Megan Rapinoe (United States), Allie Long (United States), Adriana Leon (Canada)


Sky Blue FC

 Contract options exercised: Caroline Casey, Amandine Pierre-Louis, Domi Richardson, Erica Skroski, Raquel Rodriguez, Imani Dorsey, Savannah McCaskill

Extended new contract offers: Mandy Freeman, Amanda Frisbie, Christina Gibbons, Jen Hoy, Rebekah Stott, Sarah Killion, Madison Tiernan, Shea Groom, Katie Johnson, McKenzie Meehan

Federation Players: Kailen Sheridan (Canada), Carli Lloyd (United States)


Utah Royals FC

Contract options exercised: Nicole Barnhart, Rachel Corsie, Becca Moros, Gunny Jónsdóttir, Katie Bowen, Lo’eau LaBonta, Makenzy Doniak, Taylor Lytle, Katie Stengel, Erika Tymrak

Extended new contract offers: Abby Smith, Samantha Johnson, Sydney Miramontez, Mandy Laddish, Brittany Ratcliffe

Placed on Re-Entry Wire: Katrina Gorry, Elise Thorsnes, Alex Arlitt

Federation Players: Kelley O’Hara (United States), Christen Press (United States), Becky Sauerbrunn (United States), Amy Rodriguez (United States), Desiree Scott (Canada), Diana Matheson (Canada)


Washington Spirit

Contract options exercised: Whitney Church, Mallory Eubanks, Estelle Johnson, Andi Sullivan, Kelsey Wys

Extended new contract offers: Estefanía Banini, Meggie Dougherty Howard, Caprice Dydasco, Cali Farquharson, DiDi Haracic, Ashley Hatch, Tori Huster, Joanna Lohman, Cheyna Matthews, Francisca Ordega, Arielle Ship, Havana Solaun

New contract: Aubrey Bledsoe

Placed on Re-Entry Wire: Tiffany Weimer

Federation Players: Rose Lavelle (United States), Mallory Pugh (United States), Taylor Smith (United States), Rebecca Quinn (Canada)

NWSL players available on the Re-Entry Wire

The Re-Entry Wire closes on Tuesday afternoon

(Photo credit: John Todd/isiphotos.com)

As the end of season process gets underway in the NWSL, the league announced on Monday the players that are available on the Re-Entry Wire. Teams have from 1 p.m. ET on Monday until 1 p.m. ET on Tuesday to make submissions for players on the wire, with results announced at 3 p.m. ET on Tuesday.

Player available on the Re-Entry Wire:

At the end of the season, a club must place a player on the Re-Entry Wire if her contract option was not exercised, no new contract was offered or her contract has expired. That player is then available to be selected by the league’s other clubs. If a player is selected by more than one team, her rights will be awarded to the team with a lower finish in the 2018 regular season.

Meg Morris (Portland Thorns FC) has indicated that she is retiring and is not included in the Re-Entry Wire. If a player comes out of retirement and returns to the NWSL, her rights are retained by her most recent club.

Once a team claims a player from waivers via the tiebreaker, the team moves to the bottom of the order for the remainder of the offseason.

Re-Entry Wire Tiebreaker Order:

1. Sky Blue FC
2. Washington Spirit
3. Orlando Pride
4. Houston Dash
5. Utah Royals FC
6. Chicago Red Stars
7. Seattle Reign FC
8. Portland Thorns FC
9. North Carolina Courage

Portland fans keep standards high at a record-setting final

A record-setting sellout crowd came out to Providence Park for the 2018 NWSL Championship

The Rose City Riveters display their tifo prior to the 2018 NWSL Championship between the North Carolina Courage and Portland Thorns FC at Providence Park. (Photo credit: Nikita Taparia for NWSL Media)

Portland, Oregon — For 90 minutes, they jumped and clapped and sang, and as the North Carolina Courage scored one, two, three goals, the time on the clock ticking ever higher, they held out hope for a last-minute miracle. And when it was all over, their beloved Portland Thorns defeated in the championship game in front of a sell-out crowd dressed almost all in red, the Rose City Riveters jumped and clapped and sang some more.

It wasn’t a surprising scene, to anyone who’s spent much time around these fans. This is just what they do. For the women’s game as a whole, though, this was history in the making.

“I think it’s just a huge day for women’s soccer,” said Thorns captain Christine Sinclair after the game. “This is hopefully what the future of the game is going to look like in this country, and here in Portland we have the honor and the privilege of playing in front of this crowd week in and week out.”

Although Portland has long set the standard for attendance in the league, averaging over 13,000 fans each year and over 16,000 in each of the last three seasons, this game, the highest-attended women’s club soccer championship in U.S. history and the only sell-out, was special even by this city’s standards. Providence Park’s north end, where the Riveters stand and chant to the beat of a booming red bass drum, was full to the rafters an hour before kickoff.

Following an overcast, drizzly morning (prompting chants of “let it rain, let it pour, let the Portland Thorns score” from the home fans), the sun broke through the clouds as the teams were on the field warming up. As soon as the anthem ended, the Riveters unfurled a huge two-panel tifo over the north end reading, “Where there’s fire… there’s smoke” — a dual reference, to the group’s “bonfire” chant and to the red smoke they set off when the Thorns score at home.

“It’s incredible,” said Thorns forward Caitlin Foord. “They’re by far the best fans in the world, and obviously they showcased that today. … It’s definitely the benchmark, and they’re setting the standard for football around the world in the women’s game.”

What’s striking about the crowds at Providence Park isn’t just that they’re loud — in fact, this weekend, they were less ear-splittingly loud than they were for the last sellout, a 3-1 win against Seattle in the regular season finale — but that they pay attention. The Riveters spend the whole game chanting, but the rest of the crowd doesn’t simply cheer every time Tobin Heath touches the ball, or every time play winds up near the opponent’s goal. They appreciate good combination play, slick dribbling, clever passing. They’re also liberal with their disapproval when they don’t agree with a call.

It’s an atmosphere opposing players appreciate, too. Certain visiting players, including Seattle’s Jess Fishlock and Chicago’s Sam Kerr, always seem to find another notch in Portland. This weekend, members of the Courage praised the home fans after the game. “I think this is exactly where you want to play a championship game,” said midfielder Sam Mewis. “I hope that this kind of atmosphere is what the NWSL comes to expect. … This standard here that they have in Portland is incredible, and I think it’s where we all want to be playing, is in this kind of an atmosphere. So I give the fans a lot of credit and I give the team a lot of credit for kind of creating that.”

At the end of the day, the game didn’t go Portland’s way, but the fans stayed as the team did their customary lap of the stadium, finally standing in a line in front of the north end to give their supporters one last goodbye for 2018. Head coach Mark Parsons’ young daughter, Edie, stood alongside defender Meghan Klingenberg and conducted the crowd’s cheers with a rose.

“I started tearing up a bit because — not necessarily because we lost, I mean, that does suck, but you know, you lose in life,” said Klingenberg. “It’s more about having these people around. It’s almost like having a family behind you every game. … You feel like, when you let yourself down, it’s one thing, but when you feel like you’ve let down your family, it’s something different. So it’s pretty emotional, but having them behind us is one of the best things in the world.”

The 2018 NWSL Championship in photos

A look back at the 2018 NWSL Championship

Providence Park ahead of the 2018 NWSL Championship. Photo credit: Nikita Taparia for NWSL Media)

The 2018 NWSL Championship in photos by National Women’s Soccer League on Exposure

Goalkeeper of the Year: Adrianna Franch, Portland Thorns FC

Franch made 51 saves in and earned three clean sheets in 2018

Adrianna Franch also won NWSL's Goalkeeper of the Year award in 2017. (Photo credit: Craig Mitchelldyer/isiphotos.com)

For the second-straight year, Portland Thorns FC goalkeeper Adrianna Franch has been voted Goalkeeper of the Year. The award was voted on by club officials, players, media and fans.

Following her record-breaking 11 shutout season last year, Franch, despite missing nine games this season due to injury, bounced back to lead her team back to a second-place finish. In the regular season, Franch earned 14 starts and logged three clean sheets. She finished the season with 45 saves, 12 clearances and conceded 14 goals for a save percentage of 76.3%.

Against Seattle Reign FC on July 7, Franch recorded her season-high for saves making eight on the night. Franch’s first shutout this year was against Utah Royals FC on July 7. Her second shutout was against Orlando on August 11 and her third was against Washington on August 26.

 

Seattle Reign FC goalkeeper Lydia Williams finished second in the voting and Washington Spirit goalkeeper Aubrey Bledsoe was third.

The list of finalists was decided after a preliminary round of voting by owners, general managers, coaches, players and media. The finalists were then voted on by fans, owners, general managers, coaches, players and media.

Voting Breakdown:
Preliminary Round: Owners/GMs/Coaches (25%), Media (25%) and Players (50%)
Final Round: Fans (20%), Owners/GMs/Coaches (20%), Media (20%) and Players (40%)

Goalkeeper FANS MEDIA CLUB PLAYER TOTAL
Franch 47.4% 27.5% 55.6% 31.8% 38.8%
Williams 32.7% 51.0% 22.2% 37.2% 36.1%
Bledsoe 20.0% 21.6% 22.2% 31.0% 25.2%

 

 

 

List of NWSL Goalkeepers of the Year

2013: Nicole Barnhart, FC Kansas City

2014: Alyssa Naeher, Boston Breakers

2015: Michelle Betos, Portland Thorns FC

2016: Ashlyn Harris, Orlando Pride

2017: Adrianna Franch, Portland Thorns FC

2018: Adrianna Franch, Portland Thorns FC

 

Utah Royals FC to host U.S. Soccer C License course for NWSL players

The course will begin on September 30

Utah Royals FC (Photo credit: Rob Gray/isiphotos.com)

The NWSL, Utah Royals FC and U.S. Soccer announced Thursday that NWSL players will be taking part in a cost-free 10-week coaching course at Zions Bank Real Academy Training Center in Herriman, Utah. The course will begin September 30, and 21 NWSL players are taking part in the program, the first of its kind available to the league.

 

Full NWSL news release on the coaching course, with more details:

CHICAGO (Sept. 27, 2018) — As part of its ongoing effort to make soccer the preeminent sport in the United States by developing world class players, coaches, and referees, U.S. Soccer is partnering with NWSL, Utah Royals FC and U.S. Soccer donors to provide the first step along the professional coaching pathway, the U.S. Soccer C License Course, cost-free to 21 NWSL players who will take the course.

Funded by individual donors to U.S. Soccer and the U.S. Soccer Development Fund, the 10-week U.S. Soccer C License course will provide the group of elite professional players a first-hand educational experience that will serve as their first step toward coaching as a profession.

“As the game continues to grow in the United States, we have a unique opportunity to develop the next generation of coaches from within NWSL,” said NWSL Managing Director Amanda Duffy. “This is an exciting initiative that allows the League and U.S. Soccer to offer the C License Course specifically for NWSL players at the preeminent facilities of the Utah Royals FC.”

The first in-person meeting of the course, running from Sept. 30-Oct. 7 at Zions Bank Real Academy Training Center, consists of classroom learning and field sessions. This educational phase of the course is followed by an eight-week mentorship period at each candidate’s home environment. The course concludes with a final in-person assessment meeting back at Real Academy from Dec. 7-9.

The unique coaching education initiative for current NWSL players is part of the U.S. Soccer Coaching Education Department’s continuing efforts to provide accessible education to all coaches, including opportunities to increase the number of female soccer coaches in the United States, NWSL and U.S. Soccer.

“Professional players have a unique set of experiences, which when translated into the context of coaching, can be developed into competencies and enrich the player development process,” said U.S. Soccer Director of Coaching Education Barry Pauwels. “Through U.S. Soccer’s Coaching Education program and the generous support of U.S. Soccer donors, we are excited to provide this opportunity to our NWSL teams.”

The C course is the first of its kind for NWSL players and provides a positive developmental experience within the coaching environment, allowing participants to further consider their professional opportunities beyond their playing careers. Registration for the course was open to all NWSL players meeting minimum playing experience requirements. U.S. Soccer’s philanthropic donors contributed to ensure each player could access the education cost-free.

“I’m really excited to begin this coaching course because I strive to be a good teacher of the beautiful game as a player and as a future coach,” Orlando Pride defender Ali Krieger said. “I know this is the best place to advance this journey and am grateful for the opportunity. I want to help the younger generation of footballers understand what it takes to reach their full potential, in both the physical and mental aspects of the game. It’s also very important to have a good understanding from a leadership perspective, how to get the best out of young players, and I’m ready to learn those specific tools during this course.”

The course will utilize the state-of-the-art meeting rooms and both the indoor and outdoor fields of Zions Bank Training Center, with players from the Real Salt Lake Development Academy participating in course training sessions.

U.S. Soccer Women’s National Team head coach Jill Ellis, who completed the highest level coaching license in North America in Dec. of 2017, the U.S. Soccer Pro Course, continues to be a proponent of female coaches in the game.

“We need more women in coaching. Every sport, not just soccer. We need more female involvement in administrative decisions at any level,” Ellis said. “We know we are in the minority in terms of numbers, but I think if those [people] can connect, we can be a powerful group.”

COURSE ROSTER:

Nicole Barnhart (Utah Royals)

Elizabeth Eddy (NC Courage)

Amanda Frisbie (Sky Blue FC)

Ashley Hatch (Washington Spirit)

Darian Jenkins (NC Courage)

Sammy Jo Prudhomme (Houston Dash)

Haley Kopmeyer (Orlando Pride)

Ali Krieger (Orlando Pride)

Mandy Laddish (Utah Royals)

Alyssa Mautz (Chicago Red Stars)

Meg Morris (Portland Thorns)

Rebecca Morros (Utah Royals)

Heather O’Reilly (NC Courage)

Francisca Ordega (Washington Spirit)

Angela Salem (Portland Thorns)

Abby Smith (Utah Royals)

Michele Vasconcelos (Chicago Red Stars)

Mallory Weber (Portland Thorns)

Tiffany Weimer (Washington Spirit)

Rosie White (Chicago Red Stars)

Beverly (Goebel) Yanez (Seattle Reign)

 

Defender of the Year: Abby Erceg, North Carolina Courage

Erceg played every minute of the 2018 season

The Courage defender scored two goals and added two assists this season. (Photo credit: Andy Mead/isiphotos.com)

North Carolina Courage defender Abby Erceg has been named the 2018 NWSL Defender of the Year, the league announced Thursday. The award was voted on by club officials, players, media and fans.

Erceg played every minute of the season, one of five players to do so, logging 2,160 total minutes in 24 regular season games. She anchored a Courage backline that set a league record for fewest goals allowed with 17 and earned 11 clean sheets. The Courage finished the regular season at 17-1-6 to win the NWSL Shield and went on to win the NWSL Championship — not conceding a single goal in the playoffs.

She made 110 clearances for second-best in the league and finished in fourth for blocks with 21. The captain also made 50 interceptions, won 19 tackles and won 116 duels, including 81 aerial duels. She held a passing accuracy of 81.9% in 1,047 passes and also chipped in two header goals and two assists.

Utah Royals FC defender Becky Sauerbrunn, Portland Thorns defender Emily Sonnett, Chicago Red Stars defender Julie Ertz and the Courage defender Abby Dahlkemper finished second, third, fourth and fifth respectively, in the voting.

The list of finalists was decided after a preliminary round of voting by owners, general managers, coaches, players and media. The finalists were then voted on by fans, owners, general managers, coaches, players and media.

Voting Breakdown:
Preliminary Round: Owners/GMs/Coaches (25%), Media (25%) and Players (50%)
Final Round: Fans (20%), Owners/GMs/Coaches (20%), Media (20%) and Players (40%)

Defender FANS MEDIA CLUB PLAYER TOTAL
Erceg 13.4% 35.9% 33.3% 25.6% 26.8%
Sauerbrunn 25.2% 21.8% 26.7% 25.6% 25.0%
Sonnet 25.7% 15.0% 16.7% 17.0% 18.3%
Ertz 22.7% 7.4% 16.7% 17.2% 16.2%
Dahlkemper 13.0% 20.0% 6.7% 14.7% 13.8%

 

 

Full List of NWSL Defenders of the Year

2013: Becky Sauerbrunn, FC Kansas City

2014: Becky Sauerbrunn, FC Kansas City

2015: Becky Sauerbrunn, FC Kansas City

2016: Lauren Barnes, Seattle Reign FC

2017: Abby Dahlkemper, North Carolina Courage

2018: Abby Erceg, North Carolina Courage

Coach of the Year: Paul Riley

It's the second consecutive year that Riley has won the award

Paul Riley and the North Carolina Courage finished the regular season in first place, with a 17-1-6 record. (Photo credit: Andy Mead/isiphotos.com)

North Carolina Courage head coach Paul Riley has been voted the 2018 NWSL Coach of the Year, the second consecutive year he has won the award. Riley wins the award after a record-setting regular season with the Courage. The award was voted on by fans, owners, general managers, coaches, players and media.

The 2018 season marked the second consecutive year that the Courage won the NWSL Shield, finishing with the NWSL’s best regular season record. In 2018, Riley and the Courage finished the regular season with a 17-1-6 record, setting NWSL regular season records for most wins (17), points (57), fewest losses (1), most goals scored (53), fewest goals allowed (17), goals against average (.71) and largest goal differential (+36). They also became the first team in NWSL history to go unbeaten on the road for an entire season, going 8-0-4 in the regular season away from North Carolina.

The Courage started out the regular season at 9-0-3, and finished it with an 8-0-3 run, with only the one loss to Utah Royals FC in the middle. The Courage went on to win the 2018 NWSL Championship, 3-0 over Portland Thorns FC. Outside of NWSL play, the Courage also beat Paris Saint-Germain and Olympique Lyon to win the inaugural International Champions Cup.

It’s the fifth straight season that the coach of the NWSL Shield winners has been voted Coach of the Year. Seattle Reign FC head coach Vlatko Andonovski finished second and Portland Thorns FC head coach Mark Parsons finished third.

The list of finalists was decided after a preliminary round of voting by owners, general managers, coaches, players and media. The finalists were then voted on by fans, owners, general managers, coaches, players and media.

Voting Breakdown:
Preliminary Round: Owners/GMs/Coaches (25%), Media (25%) and Players (50%)
Final Round: Fans (20%), Owners/GMs/Coaches (20%), Media (20%) and Players (40%)

 

Coach FANS MEDIA CLUB PLAYER TOTAL
Riley 31.3% 50.0% 44.4% 41.9% 41.9%
Andonovski 23.5% 28.4% 33.3% 43.4% 34.4%
Parsons 45.2% 21.6% 22.2% 14.7% 23.7%

 

Full list of NWSL Coaches of the Year

2013: Vlatko Andonovski, FC Kansas City

2014: Laura Harvey, Seattle Reign FC

2015: Laura Harvey, Seattle Reign FC

2016: Mark Parsons, Portland Thorns FC

2017: Paul Riley, North Carolina Courage

2018: Paul Riley, North Carolina Courage

Henninger, Johnson, Murillo named to Mexico’s roster for Concacaf Women’s Championship

Mexico will face the United States, Trinidad & Tobago and Panama in the tournament

Houston Dash goalkeeper Bianca Henninger in action for Mexico in 2018. (Photo credit: Brad Smith/isiphotos.com)

Mexico head coach Roberto Medina has named the 20-woman roster for the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship in October, it was announced on Wednesday. The tournament, Concacaf’s qualifying tournament for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France, will take place October 4-17. Mexico’s first game will be vs. the United States on October 4.

Three NWSL players are on the roster: Bianca Henninger (Houston Dash), Christina Murillo (Chicago Red Stars) and Katie Johnson (Sky Blue FC). [Full roster]

Group A of the tournament will feature the United States, Mexico, Trinidad & Tobago and Panama. Group A games will be played at Sahlen’s Stadium at WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary, North Carolina. Group B will feature Canada, Jamaica, Costa Rica and Cuba. Group B games will take place at H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas.

The semifinals, third-place game and championship games will be held at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas. The top three teams will automatically qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France. The fourth-place finisher will head to a home-and-away playoff with Argentina for a spot in next summer’s tournament.

 

 


Schedule:

 

October 4

Sahlen’s Stadium in Cary, North Carolina

Trinidad & Tobago vs. Panama | 5 p.m. ET

United States vs. Mexico | 7:30 p.m. ET

 

October 5

H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas

Costa Rica vs. Cuba | 6 p.m. ET

Canada vs. Jamaica | 8:30 p.m. ET

 

October 7

Sahlen’s Stadium in Cary, North Carolina

Panama vs. United States | 5 p.m. ET

Mexico vs. Trinidad & Tobago | 7:30 p.m. ET

 

October 8

H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas

Jamaica vs. Costa Rica | 6 p.m. ET

Cuba vs. Canada | 8:30 p.m. ET

 

October 10

Sahlen’s Stadium in Cary, North Carolina

Panama vs. Mexico | 5 p.m. ET

Trinidad & Tobago vs. United States | 7:30 p.m. ET

 

October 11

H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas

Cuba vs. Jamaica | 7:30 p.m. ET

Costa Rica vs. Canada | 10 p.m. ET

 

October 14

Toyota Stadium; Frisco, Texas

2nd A vs. 1st B | 5 p.m. ET*

1st A vs. 2nd B | 8 p.m. ET*

* Order of semifinal matches may be switched to accommodate broadcasters

 

October 17

Toyota Stadium; Frisco, Texas

Third-place match | 5 p.m. ET

Championship | 8 p.m. ET

 

 


Ticket info via U.S. Soccer:

CARY, N.C.

Tickets for the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship Group A doubleheaders featuring the U.S. Women’s National Team, Mexico, Trinidad & Tobago and Panama on Oct. 4, 7 and 10 in Cary, N.C., are currently on sale through ussoccer.com and by phone at 1-800-745-3000. Tickets will not be sold at the stadium except on the day of each event.

EDINBURG, TEXAS

Tickets for the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship Group B doubleheaders featuring Canada, Jamaica, Costa Rica and Cuba on Oct. 5, 8 and 11 in Edinburg, Texas, go on sale Thursday, Sept. 6, at 10 a.m. CT through ussoccer.com and by phone at 1-800-745-3000. Tickets will not be sold at the stadium except on the day of each event.

FRISCO, TEXAS

Tickets for the semifinals, Third-Place Match and the Championship Game at the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship are currently on sale through ussoccer.com, by phone at 1-855-492-8053 and at the Toyota Stadium Ticket Office.

Groups of 20 or more can order directly at ussoccer.com.

Coaches Circle and Presidents Circle members supporting the U.S. Soccer Development Fund can receive individual customer support and concierge services for their ticketing needs. Click here or contact circles@ussoccer.org for more information.

Rookie of the Year: Imani Dorsey, Sky Blue FC

Dorsey scored four goals and added an assist in 2018

Dorsey finished the season tied for first in scoring on her team (4 goals) with Katie Johnson. (Photo credit: Rob Gray/isiphotos.com)

After joining the NWSL midway through the season, Sky Blue FC forward Imani Dorsey scored four goals in her first professional season and has been voted Rookie of the Year. The award was voted on by club officials, players, media and fans.

Dorsey was selected fifth overall by Sky Blue FC in the 2018 NWSL College Draft out of Duke University. Dorsey didn’t appear for Sky Blue until June 8 because she was finishing her studies at Duke. The 22-year-old went on to appear in 13 matches for Sky Blue and chipped in one assist along with her four goals. In her rookie season she created 11 chances, held a 74.4% passing accuracy in 332 passes, and finished with 16 shots on target.

Her first professional goal came on July 7 at Yurcak Field vs. the Chicago Red Stars. After trailing the Red Stars by three goals, a solid team build up slotted in Dorsey, who slid and finished it off one-time to get her team on the board.

Dorsey scored in back-to-back games for Sky Blue against Portland on July 21 in Week 18 and against Orlando on August 5 in Week 19. Dorsey is the second player from Sky Blue FC to earn Rookie of the Year honors – midfielder Raquel Rodriguez also won in 2016.

Washington Spirit midfielder Andi Sullivan and Sky Blue FC midfielder Savannah McCaskill finished in second and third in the rookie voting this year.

The list of finalists was decided after a preliminary round of voting by owners, general managers, coaches, players and media. The finalists were then voted on by fans, owners, general managers, coaches, players and media.

Voting Breakdown:
Preliminary Round: Owners/GMs/Coaches (25%), Media (25%) and Players (50%)
Final Round: Fans (20%), Owners/GMs/Coaches (20%), Media (20%) and Players (40%)

Rookie FANS MEDIA CLUB PLAYER TOTAL
Dorsey 24.3% 39.2% 55.6% 36.4% 38.4%
Sullivan 42.4% 17.6% 33.3% 31.0% 31.1%
McCaskill 33.3% 43.1% 11.1% 32.6% 30.5%

Full list of NWSL Rookies of the Year

2013: Erika Tymrak, FC Kansas City

2014: Julie Johnston, Chicago Red Stars

2015: Danielle Colaprico, Chicago Red Stars

2016: Raquel Rodriguez, Sky Blue FC

2017: Ashley Hatch, North Carolina Courage

2018: Imani Dorsey, Sky Blue FC

Canada roster set for Concacaf Women’s Championship

Canada will play Jamaica, Costa Rica and Cuba in the group stage of the tournament

Portland Thorns FC forward Christine Sinclair in action for Canada in 2018. (Photo credit: Canada Soccer/Flickr)

Canada head coach Kenneth Heiner-Møller has named the 20-woman roster for the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship in October, Canada Soccer announced on Wednesday. The tournament, Concacaf’s qualifying tournament for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France, will take place October 4-17. Canda’s first game will be vs. Jamaica on October 5 in Edinburg, Texas.

The roster features eight NWSL players: Lindsay Agnew (Houston Dash), Allysha Chapman (Houston Dash), Shelina Zadorsky (Orlando Pride), Rebecca Quinn (Washington Spirit), Diana Matheson (Utah Royals FC), Adriana Leon (Seattle Reign FC), Nichelle Prince (Houston Dash) and Christine Sinclair (Portland Thorns FC). The Canadian Press reported on Wednesday that Utah Royals FC midfielder Desiree Scott will miss the tournament due to a foot injury.

Canada Concacaf Women’s National Team Roster

GK – Stephanie Labbé, age 31, from Stony Plain, AB/ Lejonflocken Linköping (Damallsvenskan)
GK – Erin McLeod, age 35, from St. Albert, AB/ SC Sand (Frauen-Bundesliga)
FB – Lindsay Agnew, age 23, from Kingston, ON/ Houston Dash (NWSL)
FB – Allysha Chapman, age 29, from Courtice, ON/ Houston Dash (NWSL)
FB – Ashley Lawrence, age 23, from Caledon, ON/Paris Saint Germain (Division 1 Féminine France)
FB – Emma Regan, age 18, from Burnaby, BC/ The University of Texas at Austin (NCAA)
CB – Kadeisha Buchanan, age 22, from Brampton, ON/ Olympique Lyonnais (Division 1 Féminine France)
CB – Shelina Zadorsky, age 25, from London, ON/ Orlando Pride (NWSL)
M/CB – Rebecca Quinn, age 23, from Toronto, ON/ Washington Spirit (NWSL)
M – Jessie Fleming, age 20, from London, ON/UCLA (NCAA)
M – Julia Grosso, age 18, from Vancouver, BC / The University of Texas at Austin (NCAA)
M – Diana Matheson, age 34, from Oakville, ON/Utah Royals FC (NWSL)
M- Sophie Schmidt, age 30, from Abbotsford, BC/ FFC Frankfurt (Frauen-Bundesliga)
M- Gabrielle Carle, age 19, from Levis, QC/ Florida State University (NCAA)
F- Jordyn Huitema, age 17, from Chilliwack, BC/ Vancouver Whitecaps FC Girls Elite/ Canada Soccer Regional EXCEL Super Centre (British Columbia)
F – Adriana Leon, age 25, from King City, ON/ Seattle Reign FC (NWSL)
F – Nichelle Prince, age 23, from Ajax, ON/ Houston Dash (NWSL)
F – Deanne Rose, age 19, from Alliston, ON/ University of Florida Gators (NCAA)
F – Christine Sinclair ( C ), age 35, from Burnaby, BC/ Portland Thorns (NWSL)
F – Janine Beckie, age 24, from Highlands Ranch, CO/ Manchester City (FA Women’s Super League)

The roster is only 20 players, down from the 23 were selected the last time out for Canada in their friendly vs. Brazil earlier this month, and three less than would be on a World Cup squad next summer.

Group A of the tournament will feature the United States, Mexico, Trinidad & Tobago and Panama. Group A games will be played at Sahlen’s Stadium at WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary, North Carolina. Group B will feature Canada, Jamaica, Costa Rica and Cuba. Group B games will take place at H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas.

The semifinals, third-place game and championship games will be held at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas. The top three teams will automatically qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France. The fourth-place finisher will head to a home-and-away playoff with Argentina for a spot in next summer’s tournament.


Schedule:

 

October 4

Sahlen’s Stadium in Cary, North Carolina

Trinidad & Tobago vs. Panama | 5 p.m. ET

United States vs. Mexico | 7:30 p.m. ET

 

October 5

H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas

Costa Rica vs. Cuba | 6 p.m. ET

Canada vs. Jamaica | 8:30 p.m. ET

 

October 7

Sahlen’s Stadium in Cary, North Carolina

Panama vs. United States | 5 p.m. ET

Mexico vs. Trinidad & Tobago | 7:30 p.m. ET

 

October 8

H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas

Jamaica vs. Costa Rica | 6 p.m. ET

Cuba vs. Canada | 8:30 p.m. ET

 

October 10

Sahlen’s Stadium in Cary, North Carolina

Panama vs. Mexico | 5 p.m. ET

Trinidad & Tobago vs. United States | 7:30 p.m. ET

 

October 11

H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas

Cuba vs. Jamaica | 7:30 p.m. ET

Costa Rica vs. Canada | 10 p.m. ET

 

October 14

Toyota Stadium; Frisco, Texas

2nd A vs. 1st B | 5 p.m. ET*

1st A vs. 2nd B | 8 p.m. ET*

* Order of semifinal matches may be switched to accommodate broadcasters

 

October 17

Toyota Stadium; Frisco, Texas

Third-place match | 5 p.m. ET

Championship | 8 p.m. ET

 

 


Ticket info via U.S. Soccer:

CARY, N.C.

Tickets for the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship Group A doubleheaders featuring the U.S. Women’s National Team, Mexico, Trinidad & Tobago and Panama on Oct. 4, 7 and 10 in Cary, N.C., are currently on sale through ussoccer.com and by phone at 1-800-745-3000. Tickets will not be sold at the stadium except on the day of each event.

EDINBURG, TEXAS

Tickets for the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship Group B doubleheaders featuring Canada, Jamaica, Costa Rica and Cuba on Oct. 5, 8 and 11 in Edinburg, Texas, go on sale Thursday, Sept. 6, at 10 a.m. CT through ussoccer.com and by phone at 1-800-745-3000. Tickets will not be sold at the stadium except on the day of each event.

FRISCO, TEXAS

Tickets for the semifinals, Third-Place Match and the Championship Game at the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship are currently on sale through ussoccer.com, by phone at 1-855-492-8053 and at the Toyota Stadium Ticket Office.

Groups of 20 or more can order directly at ussoccer.com.

Coaches Circle and Presidents Circle members supporting the U.S. Soccer Development Fund can receive individual customer support and concierge services for their ticketing needs. Click here or contact circles@ussoccer.org for more information.

NWSL Championship goals in slow motion

Two goals from McDonald, and one from Debinha

Jessica McDonald and Debinha scored for the Courage in their NWSL Championship win. (Photo credit: John Todd/isiphotos.com)

A closer look at Jessica McDonald‘s brace and Debinha‘s opening goal from the North Carolina Courage’s 3-0 NWSL Championship win over Portland Thorns FC on September 22.

 

Debinha


Jessica McDonald’s first goal


McDonald’s second goal

Seattle Reign FC sign Elise Kellond-Knight

The Australian midfielder will join the Reign for the 2019 season

Elise Kellond-Knight will join Seattle Reign FC for the 2019 season. (Photo credit: Robin Alam/isiphotos.com)

In the first signing off the season offseason, Seattle Reign FC announced Monday that Australian midfielder Elise Kellond-Knight will join the team for the 2019 season.

Kellond-Knight will join Seattle after finishing out her time with Hammarby in Sweden and then joining Melbourne City for the upcoming W-League season in Australia.

“I’m so happy to have finally come to an agreement with the NWSL to join Seattle Reign FC in the upcoming 2019 NWSL season,” said Kellond-Knight. “They are a class team who play a style of football that I can see myself enjoying.”

Kellond-Knight has 95 career international caps, and has appeared in two Women’s World Cups for the Matildas.

“We’re excited to have Elise on the team. We’ve been working a long time to find a way to bring her to the club,” said Seattle Reign FC head coach Vlatko Andonovski. “She’s a very talented player who will add another dimension to our midfield. We can’t wait to get started and see Elise on the pitch.”

Marta voted 2018 FIFA The Best Women’s Player

It's the sixth World Player of the Year award for Marta

Marta won her record sixth FIFA World Player of the Year honor on Monday. (Photo credit: Jeremy Reper/isiphotos.com)

Orlando Pride forward Marta has been voted 2018 FIFA The Best Women’s Player. The winner was announced on Monday in London. Marta was one of three finalists, alongside Ada Hegerberg (Lyon) and Dzsenifer Marozsán (Germany/Lyon).

It’s the sixth time that Marta has been honored as the world’s best player — winning in 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and now 2018. No women’s or men’s player has won the award more times than Marta.

The time period considered for the award was August 7, 2017 to May 24, 2018. Marta finished the 2017 season second in the Golden Boot race with 13 goals, second for assists with six — and finished second in the NWSL MVP voting for the 2017 season. She played in 13 NWSL games in the time period considered, scoring 7 goals and 4 assists, and was also named to the 2017 NWSL Best XI. This spring, Marta led Brazil to a Copa América Femenina tournament win in Chile, which qualified Brazil for next summer’s Women’s World Cup.

The award was voted on by fans, selected media, national team coaches and national team captains, from an original shortlist of 10 players. FIFA has released the breakdown of votes for coaches, captains and media. That can be found here.

“I’m really speechless because this is a fantastic moment and people tell me, ‘You’ve been in this position so many times before, and every time you get emotional.’ I do this because this means so much to me, since the first moment that I saw that this is the best thing I can do with my life, which is to play soccer, and to practice this fantastic sport,” Marta said after accepting the award. The Orlando Pride released a translated (from Portuguese to English) transcript of her remarks. “Firstly, I would like to thank God for constantly giving me health and for always giving me the ability to fight and to reach my goals. I can’t go without thanking, obviously, my teammates — from the Club and the Brazilian team – the people who are with me and constantly supporting me, the fans, the press and all the athletes that are my coworkers who voted for me. I can only thank everyone, this is fantastic. It really is a magical moment, thank you.”

 The shortlists were put together by a panel of 12 experts, including Mia Hamm, Sissi, Sun Wen and Nadine Keßler.

Four NWSL or former NWSL players made the original shortlist — Marta, Chicago Red Stars forward Sam Kerr, Seattle Reign FC forward Megan Rapinoe and former Portland Thorns FC midfielder Amandine Henry (Olympique Lyon) — with Marta making it as one of three finalists after voting. Marta, Kerr and Rapinoe were all finalists for the 2017 NWSL MVP award.

The original shortlist of nominees for best women’s player: Lucy Bronze (England/Lyon), Pernille Harder (Denmark/Wolfsburg), Ada Hegerberg (Lyon), Amandine Henry (France/Lyon), Sam Kerr (Australia/Chicago Red Stars), Saki Kumagai (Japan/Lyon), Dzsenifer Marozsán (Germany/Lyon), Marta (Brazil/Orlando Pride), Megan Rapinoe (United States/Seattle Reign FC) and Wendie Renard (France/Lyon).

Seattle Reign FC loan Jess Fishlock to Lyon

Fishlock's loan will run until the conclusion of Lyon's Champions League campaign

Seattle Reign FC midfielder Jess Fishlock scored two goals in 2018. (Photo credit: Bryan Byerly/isiphotos.com)

Seattle Reign FC have loaned midfielder Jess Fishlock to Olympique Lyon, the Reign announced Monday. The loan is effective immediately and will conclude when Lyon’s 2018/2019 UEFA Women’s Champions League campaign is complete.

The Champions League Final — which Lyon will be a favorite to appear in — is scheduled for May 18, 2019. Lyon are the three-time defending champions.

“Growing up in Europe it was always a dream to someday play in the Champions League – it is a magical competition. When I went on loan to Frankfurt in 2015 I got to enjoy the competition, but I had to return to the NWSL prior to the final. I feel very lucky to have the chance to return to the competition with Lyon and to hopefully have the chance to play in the final,” Fishlock said in a Reign news release.

“Seattle have been fantastic and have always supported me. I am extremely thankful to be part of such a tremendous organization. I cannot wait to get back to Seattle to work towards the title next season with the Reign.”

Jessica McDonald comes up big in Portland, named Championship MVP

McDonald scored twice in North Carolina's 3-0 win over Portland

Jessica McDonald scored twice as the Courage beat the Thorns in the 2018 NWSL Championship. (Photo credit: John Todd/isiphotos.com)

Portland, Oregon — Jessica McDonald‘s journey as a player is surely not over, but Saturday, one chapter came to an almost too-neat ending as she returned to Portland — in front of a sell-out crowd of 21,144 — to win a championship against the club that traded her for a draft pick in 2015.

“I don’t know if you can write a better script,” said North Carolina Courage coach Paul Riley, who was also her coach in Portland back in 2014. “She leads the league in assists, and I think that was the tenth goal this season. That’s unbelievable… I think Jess Mac’s getting better with age.”

The last few years, for McDonald, have been difficult in more ways than one. After starting at forward for the first 11 games of the 2014 season, she was relegated to the bench when Alex Morgan recovered from injury. She scored eight goals in that stretch and would end the season, one in which the Thorns lost in the semifinal round to Kansas City, as the team’s leading goalscorer. Despite that performance, she wound up in Houston in 2015 (where she was also the leading scorer), before finally landing in Western New York, back with Riley, in 2016. Add in the move from Rochester to Cary, North Carolina, when the franchise was sold and relocated, and a mid-season trade from Chicago to Seattle in 2013, and McDonald has lived in six different cities in the last five years.

“I’ve bounced around a lot in this league,” McDonald said after the game, “and I finally found a home. I found a place where I’m comfortable, where my kid is comfortable as well, and that kind of comfort sort of gives me some motivation. The fact that a team really continues to want me with their organization, it’s kind of nice for me as an individual.”

It’s clear why North Carolina values McDonald. Beyond her performance in the championship match, which saw her score two goals, she’s been a key offensive asset for her team all season. She’s the league leader in assists this year with eight, on top of her ten goals. That’s a big improvement over last season, when she notched just four goals and two assists.

“Me and Jess had a little moment in the locker room,” said North Carolina forward Lynn Williams after the game. “I’ve obviously played with her for the last three years and I think last year she fell short of her goals. She was going through some personal stuff and life changes for her, and to see her this season, she obviously took a different role of being more of an assister. With these two playoff games, I don’t think she’s ever played better.”

Adding to the difficulty of getting bounced around from team to team is that McDonald has a young son. “You know, after practice, we go home,” said Riley. “I go home, I do a bit of reading, most of them probably sleep. But this one has to work even harder, with her kid, so I give her an amazing amount of credit.”

Midfielder Sam Mewis echoed Riley. “I think her commitment to putting soccer first has been really admirable,” said Mewis. “Jess has a family, she has a lot of other things going on in her life, and for her to be performing this well is incredible. The rest of us, this is our number one priority, and she’s like, FaceTiming her kid on the bus. And I think that for her to be able to do both is such a huge accomplishment, and it’s a sign that anyone can do anything, and I think we all really admire her commitment to the team and her commitment to her family as well.”

The stability she’s found in North Carolina has made her continued improvement as a player possible — and according to Riley, she’s performing well beyond what the team expected from her. “At the beginning of the season, I thought if we could get four or five out of Jess we’d be good, you know, get ten twelve games out of her. But as the season went on she got better and better, she took care of herself off the field.”

“She just makes it hard,” said Thorns defender Meghan Klingenberg. “She’ll run when her team needs her to run. She’ll press, she gets in behind, and she likes to cause a bit of havoc in front of goal.”

McDonald’s success this season can’t be separated from her partnership with Williams, which has strengthened in the duo’s third year together. “We trust each other,” says Williams. “We know what each other does well and we let that person do it. … She has been the person to check off more off the back line, and I’m the person to go in behind, and it’s worked.”

What defines North Carolina is their team ethos — how far more than any individual player, the roots of this team’s success are a system that works perfectly with their roster, and a group of players willing to work for each other when the chips are down. All the same, on this day, in this stadium packed with Portland fans, McDonald was crucial. “She’s a worker,” said Williams. “She pushes both of us to be better, and I like to think we uplift each other, and I don’t have anything else to say, but that was amazing! She was so awesome.”

NWSL MVP: Lindsey Horan, Portland Thorns FC

The midfielder scored 13 goals (3rd in the NWSL) and added two assists

Lindsey Horan was named 2018 NWSL MVP on Friday. (Photo credit: Craig Mitchelldyer/isiphotos.com)

Portland, Oregon — Portland Thorns FC midfielder Lindsey Horan has been named the 2018 NWSL Most Valuable Player, the league announced Friday. The award was voted on by club officials, players, media and fans.

Horan played 1,980 minutes over 22 games to lead the Thorns to an 12-6-6 (42 points) overall record good for second place in the NWSL.

NWSL Managing Director Amanda Duffy presented the award to Horan at Providence Park on Friday.

“Obviously, it’s a huge honor for me. I think this year has been incredible for our team. It’s been a roller coaster ride and we have dealt with so much adversity and injuries, etc., so credit to my team and what they have done this year to get us to this point,” Horan said at the press conference. “I thank them and I’m so grateful for them, and this staff too. They have pushed me hard every single day and have got me to this point, so it’s just an honor to receive this award with my team behind me and my staff behind me. Again, the players that were up for this — McCall [Zerboni], Pinoe [Megan Rapinoe], Sam [Kerr] and Lynn [Williams] — they are incredible and it’s just an honor to be amongst them as well.”

“Really happy for her,” Thorns head coach Mark Parsons said at the coaches press conference ahead of the championship. “The people across the league, media, players, and coaches have shown her appreciation for what she’s done this season, because it’s been nothing short of exceptional. I have said it a few times now I think she’s the only one capable of having the impact across so many different areas on and off the ball; offensive and defensive sides this season. … I said it in ‘16, I said it at ‘17, and I’ll say it again now, she is at a very, very elite level and I think she’s just getting started, she really is and she’ll say that herself.”

Horan scored 13 goals (third in the NWSL) and chipped in two assists, scoring at a rate of 152.3 minutes per goal in 30 shots on target. Six of Horan’s goals she finished with her head. The midfielder led the league in total touches (1,852) and duels won (297), including aerial duels (141). Horan finished fourth in the league for tackles won (47) and third in the league for headed clearances (42). She topped the season off with 25 chances created and held a passing accuracy of 75.2% (1,293 passes).

In July, Horan earned Player of the Month honors for the first time after she scored three goals and added an assist to lead her team to an undefeated 3-0 run during the month of July. Although she didn’t play in the Thorns 2-1 win over Sky Blue FC due to national team duty, in the two games she did play in July she led her team to a 4-0 win over Utah Royals FC and then a 3-1 victory vs. the Houston Dash. Horan was also named to the Team of the Month five times this season.

Horan is the first MVP to have not won the Golden Boot that season.

Chicago Red Stars forward Sam Kerr finished second in MVP voting. Seattle Reign FC forward Megan Rapinoe was third. North Carolina Courage midfielder McCall Zerboni was fourth. Courage forward Lynn Williams was fifth.

The list of five finalists was decided after a preliminary round of voting by owners, general managers, coaches, players and media. The finalists were then voted on by fans, owners, general managers, coaches, players and media.

Voting Breakdown:
Preliminary Round: Owners/GMs/Coaches (25%), Media (25%) and Players (50%)
Final Round: Fans (20%), Owners/GMs/Coaches (20%), Media (20%) and Players (40%)

MVP FANS MEDIA CLUB PLAYER TOTAL
Horan 30.9% 34.7% 36.7% 28.8% 32.0%
Kerr 23.8% 26.2% 20.0% 27.0% 24.8%
Rapinoe 20.9% 12.4% 20.0% 20.7% 18.9%
Zerboni 10.9% 17.1% 0.0% 17.1% 12.4%
Williams 13.5% 9.7% 23.3% 6.5% 11.9%

 

Full list of NWSL MVPs

2013: Lauren Holiday, FC Kansas City

2014: Kim Little, Seattle Reign FC

2015: Crystal Dunn, Washington Spirit

2016: Lynn Williams, Western New York Flash

2017: Sam Kerr, Sky Blue FC

2018: Lindsey Horan, Portland Thorns FC

How pressure, adversity, molded the Portland Thorns

The Thorns will face the Courage on Saturday afternoon in a rematch of the 2017 NWSL Championship

The Thorns will meet the Courage on Saturday in a rematch of last year's final. (Photo credit: Craig Mitchelldyer/isiphotos.com)

Portland, Oregon — Thinking about the Portland Thorns, the first thing that comes to mind is probably the sheer level of talent on the team’s roster. Tobin Heath. Christine Sinclair. Lindsey Horan. These are some of the best players in the game, all at the top of their careers, and obviously, they all play a huge role in the team’s success. What’s less obvious about the Thorns — despite those big names, and despite the fact that they now find themselves in contention for a championship for the second year in a row — is the very real adversity they’ve been through this year, and how those challenges have molded the character of the team.

One of the defining features of the 2018 season, for Portland, has been the spate of injuries the team endured early on. And while, with the exception of Heath, most of those injuries weren’t to players often seen in lights outside the Rose City, they impacted multiple key pieces of the team.

Center back Emily Menges was out until mid-May. Goalkeeper Adrianna Franch played the first three games of the season, then sat out until late June. Then it was Midge Purce‘s turn, then Katherine Reynolds, then Emily Sonnett, then Purce again. All that came on top of the fact that one of Portland’s key offseason acquisitions, Caitlin Foord, had to sit out the majority of the season after sustaining a foot injury in the W-League playoffs. And all that, of course, happened in the most competitive season in the history of the NWSL.

“I’m a firm believer that the weakest moments make some of the strongest teams,” said Purce on Media Day on Thursday. “Something that makes our team special is we’ve had to go through a lot of ups and downs. … I just think our team has this unbelievable belief in ourselves.”

That belief hasn’t always been there, either this season or in previous years. The 2016 Thorns — whose core was the same as that of this team — won the NWSL Shield only to fall 3-4 to Western New York in the semifinals, after extra time. Earlier this season, they dropped a series of results at home, to Washington, Seattle, Orlando, North Carolina, and even then-winless Sky Blue. With the group of available players running low, those results were understandable, to an extent — but ultimately, the team knew they had to start finding ways to get results, regardless of the challenges placed in their way.

“Mark [Parsons] kind of zoomed in on [how] we can’t control what the other team’s going to do, we can’t control this, this, this, and this,” said Menges. “But your focus and your grit and your hard work, you can always control. … That’s always been a baseline of our team, but I definitely think there was a turning point in the middle of the season where we had to kind of remind ourselves to do that again.”

As far as focus and grit go, the team’s August 18 draw against Chicago at home is a case study. Although Portland was 4-1-0 since July 6 at that point (after going 5-5-5 to start the season), the four wins in that period were games they should have been expected to win — they were all against teams they’d gotten results against already. Faced with a very good Red Stars team fronted by Sam Kerr, a player notorious for scoring braces at Providence Park, they did something that felt new. They went down two goals, both by Kerr, and came back to draw.

“Two-nil down, we couldn’t come back against Seattle and Orlando earlier in the year,” said Parsons at a training in August. “The fact that we’ve got over that, I felt we were going to score. … That’s credit to the mentality and character that’s here.”

“I think it’s just the character of the team,” said Heath. “We have a great team, a super tight, united team and I think it shows in the results and the performances that we’ve had this year. We’ve had a lot of games that we have gone down a goal and we’ve been able to come back and have that belief within the locker room and within each other.”

There are plenty of examples of when the grit present in this team has come in handy. July 21 away against Sky Blue, when the team was again without multiple core players due to the Tournament of Nations, was one. August 25 against Washington, when they turned in one of their most dominant offensive performances to that point after a three-game week that included a difficult travel day, was another. But that mentality has never been quite as visible as it was in their last two games, both against Seattle at home, one at the end of the regular season and the other in the semifinals.

In the first game, Jess Fishlock scored early, which only seemed to motivate the Thorns to work harder and push for a goal. They equalized back in the 30th minute with an emphatic goal by Lindsey Horan, then won thanks to a second by Heath and a third by Horan. The semifinal was a similar story: Portland conceded midway through the first half, but came back to win.

“When we go down, our mentality has been stronger than ever,” said defender Emily Sonnett. “[In the first] Seattle game, we go down a goal in the first four, five minutes. I think it’s incredible how our team could kind of push, stick to the game plan, not freak out, and score a couple for the win.”

This team, most agree, is a better attacking side than last year’s championship squad. Beyond the starting lineup, from the top of the roster to the bottom, it may be a deeper team than the Thorns have ever had. None of that matters if the team’s mentality isn’t up for the challenges this super-competitive league presents.

“I think we’re more of a team this year,” said Thorns captain Christine Sinclair. “I think last year, if we would’ve gone down two goals, we weren’t coming back from that. … Whereas this year we have that trust in each other, and we’ll do it as a team.”

That cohesiveness is something that’s been molded in part by the number of must-win games Portland has played in throughout the final stretch of the season. “If you take the last four, five games that we’ve played, those were all must-win games for us,” says Heath. “I think for a lot of people, they don’t realize that we’ve been playing in these championship games for a while now. So this team understands pressure and this team understands what’s required to get results.”

When they face North Carolina, the best team in NWSL history, on Saturday, the Thorns’ battle-hardened mentality will be put to the test, something the team is ready for. “Under pressure, I think that’s where we’re at our best,” says Sonnett. “I think pressure defines what we do.”

Courage channeling underdog mentality ahead of NWSL Championship

Courage and Thorns meet in the NWSL Championship on Saturday at Providence Park

Lynn Williams finished second in the Golden Boot race with 14 goals this season. (Photo credit: Craig Mitchelldyer/isiphotos.com)

Portland, Oregon — No team has beaten the North Carolina Courage on the road this season. No NWSL team has ever won more games, earned more points, scored more, or allowed fewer goals than the Courage. But, on Saturday when the Courage face Portland Thorns FC in the 2018 NWSL Championship at Providence Park, the Courage feel like the underdogs.

“I always say this, but there is nothing better than hearing the dead silence of a home crowd,” Courage forward Lynn Williams said as both the Courage and Thorns took part in Media Day ahead on Thursday. “And I think that’s our mentality going into Saturday. Between the hurricane and not getting our home-field advantage [in the semifinal], and then coming here, playing a game and now having three days less rest than them [Portland], and they are actually on their home ground – We are the underdogs.”

The Courage, despite becoming the best American women’s professional soccer team in history per their points per game average of 2.375, feel like their backs are against the wall. There is something about Providence Park – whether that be the chants that erupt the stands or the red Thorns jerseys that bleed throughout — that can make even the very best of teams nervous. But, while nerves are most certainly present, more than that, it’s the edge that the Courage feel like they have gained from this final stretch of the season.

The Courage lost one of their best midfielders, MVP finalist McCall Zerboni, to a broken elbow that she suffered in the U.S. national team’s win over Chile on September 4. After that, the Courage had their home semifinal game moved from North Carolina due to Hurricane Florence. The game was shifted to Providence Park on Tuesday, where the Courage shutout the Chicago Red Stars 2-0 to advance to the championship. The Thorns defeated Seattle Reign FC 2-1 on that Saturday to punch their ticket to the final. The Courage and Thorns will now meet in a rematch of the 2017 NWSL Championship, which was won by the Thorns.

“I think we play our best when we feel like our backs are against a wall a bit,” Williams said. Williams led the Courage in scoring this season with 14 goals, good for runner-up in the Golden Boot. Teammate midfielder Elizabeth Eddy said she thinks playing away gives her side — which went 8-0-4 on the road in the regular season — an “edge.”

“Not that you need an edge, but [this is] something extra to fight against and use to bond together. It’s this us against the world mentality – like bring it, nothing is stopping us!”

Midfielder Sam Mewis, who scored the Courage’s second goal on Tuesday night, finishing an upper-90 blast from outside the box said, “I think that this sense of being underdogs goes back to 2016 when we were the Western New York Flash and Paul [Riley] came in and we hadn’t had a great season the year before and went on to win it.” The WNY Flash, before being sold and relocated to North Carolina after that season, defeated the Washington Spirit in penalty kicks to win the 2016 NWSL Championship.

“I think the core of this team has kept this feeling. We train like underdogs, we always have kept this sense that it’s us against the world.”

The Courage will also be up against the “Curse of the Shield” – no NWSL Shield winner has ever won the NWSL Championship in five NWSL seasons. The Courage claimed this year’s Shield with a record-breaking 17 wins and 57 points, but will face a team that has never lost in the NWSL Championship, earning the crest in 2013 and 2017. The Thorns enter this weekend’s game in peak form – they finished the regular season in second place with an overall record of 12-6-6 and 42 points. The Thorns are undefeated in their last six games – with their last loss coming against the Courage on August 5.

“They have been fantastic all season. I kind of think the pressure is on them to win a championship with everything they have done this season,” Thorns midfielder Tobin Heath said. “I have said it all year that we’re a championship team, and we’re built for these moments, and it’s one game. I say it too, you learn a lot from your losses. We’ve played them three times and we’ve lost, and from that we’ve learned.”

Heath scored the Thorns’ equalizer against the Reign on Saturday and has eight goals and seven assists this season. Heath mentioned that her side has yet to beat the Courage since last year’s Championship – the Courage won all three times vs. the Thorns this season; by a scoreline of 1-0 on March 24, 4-1 on May 30 and, most recently, 2-1 on August 5.

The last time the Courage played against the Thorns at Providence Park, the silence Williams mentioned she loves hearing on the road was most certainly heard that evening in May. Williams scored twice, and Mewis and midfielder Debinha also chipped in a goal each.

“We’re going to get booed and it’s fine. We know it’s coming,” Williams said. “You’re not going to hear your teammates very well, or your coaches, but you know what — we’re just going to have to give it our all.”

2018 NWSL Best XI and Second XI announced

The best of the 2018 NWSL season

The NWSL announced the 2018 Best XI and Second XI on Thursday afternoon. The Best XI and Second XI are a result of votes from September 16-18 among players, media, fans and owners/GMs/coaches.

Voting breakdown: Fans (20%), Owners/GMs/Coaches (20%), Media (20%) and Players (40%).

 

2018 NWSL Best XI

Goalkeeper: Adrianna Franch

Defenders: Emily Sonnett, Becky Sauerbrunn, Abby Erceg, Abby Dahlkemper

Midfielders: Tobin Heath, Lindsey Horan, McCall Zerboni

Forwards: Crystal Dunn, Sam Kerr, Megan Rapinoe

 

2018 NWSL Second XI

Goalkeeper: Lydia Williams

Defenders: Merritt Mathias, Julie Ertz, Emily Menges, Steph Catley

Midfielders: Debinha, Carli Lloyd, Christine Sinclair

Forwards: Lynn Williams, Rachel Daly, Sofia Huerta

 

A look at the regular season stats of the 2018 NWSL Best XI:

 

GK: Adrianna Franch, Portland Thorns FC

Portland Thorns FC goalkeeper Adrianna Franch made 14 starts in 2018, posting three clean sheets. She made 45 saves, conceded 14 goals and held a save percentage of 76.3%.


D: Emily Sonnett, Portland Thorns FC

Portland Thorns FC defender Emily Sonnett played 1,755 minutes over 20 games in 2018 and her 104 clearances ranked third in the NWSL. She recorded 14 blocks, 35 interceptions, 18 tackles won and 68 duels won. She also had one goal and one assist, and held a 77.8% passing accuracy (886 passes).


D: Becky Sauerbrunn, Utah Royals FC

Utah Royals FC defender Becky Sauerbrunn played 1,720 minutes over 20 appearances in 2018, as Utah’s finished the season allowing the third-fewest goals in the league. She was the league’s most efficient passer (minimum 400 pass attempts) with an 86.23% passing accuracy over 1,046 passes. Her 18 blocks ranked 5th in the NWSL and 90 clearances ranked 10th in the NWSL. She also had 20 tackles won, 78 duels won, and 49 interceptions.


D: Abby Erceg, North Carolina Courage

North Carolina Courage defender Abby Erceg played every minute (2,160) in 2018, one of five players to do so, as the Courage allowed the fewest goals in the league and earned 11 clean sheets. She made 110 clearances (2nd in the NWSL), 21 blocks (4th), 50 interceptions and 19 tackles won. She won 116 duels, including 81 aerial duels, which ranked 5th in the league. She held an 81.9% passing accuracy (1047 passes) and added two goals and two assists.


D: Abby Dahlkemper, North Carolina Courage

North Carolina Courage defender Abby Dahlkemper appeared in 19 games in 2018 for the league’s best-ranked defense. She made 60 clearances, 11 blocks, 20 interceptions, eight tackles won and 39 duels won. She held a passing accuracy of 79.3% (885 passes).


M: Tobin Heath, Portland Thorns FC

In 17 games, Portland Thorns FC midfielder Tobin Heath finished the regular season with seven assists (tied for second-best in the NWSL) and seven goals in 17 shots on target. She also recorded 28 chances created and 26 successful crosses/corners, while holding a passing accuracy of 76.4% (534 passes).


M: Lindsey Horan, Portland Thorns FC

Portland Thorns FC midfielder Lindsey Horan played 1,980 minutes over 22 games as the Thorns went 12-6-6 (42 points) and finished second in the NWSL. She scored 13 goals (3rd in the NWSL) and added two assists, scoring at a rate of 152.3 minutes per goal in 30 shots on target. She led the league in total touches (1,852) and duels won (297), including aerial duels (141), which was also first in the league. She also had 47 tackles won (tied for 4th in the NWSL), 42 headed clearances (3rd). She recorded 25 chances created and held a passing accuracy of 75.2% (1,293 passes).


M: McCall Zerboni, North Carolina Courage

North Carolina Courage midfielder McCall Zerboni played 1,800 minutes over 20 games for the Courage, as North Carolina posted a 17-1-6 record (57 points) and finished first in the league. She led the league in tackles won with 63 and finished second in interceptions with 70. She won 203 duels, third best in the NWSL, 47 of which were aerial duels. She finished 10th in total touches with 1,422. She also added three goals in eight shots on target and 25 chances created. She held a passing accuracy of 75.9% (995 passes).


F: Crystal Dunn, North Carolina Courage

North Carolina Courage forward Crystal Dunn appeared in 22 games in her first year with the Courage, scoring eight goals and five assists. She finished the regular season second in the NWSL in chances created with 47 and led the league in dribbles completed (46). She also won 127 duels and 41 tackles.


F: Sam Kerr, Chicago Red Stars

Chicago Red Stars forward Sam Kerr played 1,704 minutes over 19 games for the Red Stars as the team finished fourth in the NWSL with a 9-5-10 record (37 points). Her 16 goals lead the league, and she added four assists. Her 40 chances created tied for 9th in the NWSL. She scored at a rate of 106.5 minutes per goal in 47 shots on target. She won 129 duels, tied for 12th in the league, 70 of which were aerial duels, 9th in the NWSL.


F: Megan Rapinoe, Seattle Reign FC

Seattle Reign FC forward Megan Rapinoe played 1,315 minutes over 16 games for the Reign as they finished third in the NWSL with an 11-5-8 record and 41 points. She scored seven goals (tied for 10th) and had six assists (tied for 4th in the league). She scored at a rate of 187.9 minutes per goal in 37 shots on target. Her 41 chances created ranked 8th in the NWSL and 27 successful crosses/corners ranked 6th in the NWSL. She won 114 duels, 31 in the air.

 


Additional end of season statistical league leaders are available here.

Vera Pauw leaves the Houston Dash

Pauw served as the Dash's head coach for one season

Vera Pauw led the Dash to a 9-10-5 overall record in 2018. (Photo credit: Jane Gershovich/isiphotos.com)

Houston Dash head coach Vera Pauw has stepped down from her position with the organization, the club announced on Thursday. Pauw did not seek a new contract with the team to return to her home in the Netherlands to be closer to her family

After her one season with the Dash, Pauw’s side earned nine wins this year and finished the regular season at 9-10-5 and 32 points, good for sixth place in the league standings.

“While the Houston Dash is a phenomenal club with huge potential and an amazing fan base, I have decided to not pursue a contract extension. Although we set club records in many categories and stayed in the playoff race until the final week of the season, it is best for me to go back to my husband in The Netherlands,” Pauw said in the Houston Dash’s press release.

“I thank club management for the ongoing support of the changes that had to be made. I leave a young team that is ready for the future. The foundation is set, and I wish the club the success it deserves.”

Before coaching in Houston, Pauw coached the South African Women’s National Team through the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, as well as the 2014 Confederation of African Football Women’s Championship. She also served as the technical director for the Russian women’s national team and spent a short role as an interim head coach for Russia. She was also the head coach for her home nation of the Netherlands and Scotland. Prior to her coaching days, Pauw also earned 89 caps for the Netherlands before she retired in 1998.

Houston Dash president Chris Canetti and Dash Managing Director Brian Ching will lead the search process for the next head coach along with overseeing the team. The search for Houston’s new head coach will begin immediately.

North Carolina adapts mid-game, shuts down Chicago’s offense

The Courage shut out the Red Stars to advance to the NWSL Championship

The Courage defense shut out the Red Stars offense on Tuesday night -- including two-time Golden Boot winner Sam Kerr. (Photo credit: Craig Mitchelldyer/isiphotos.com)

Portland, Oregon — As a team, the North Carolina Courage are known for their ridiculously dominant offense, which uses a high-pressing approach to take control of games and keep opposing defenses on their back foot. But Tuesday night in their semifinal against the Chicago Red Stars, the story wasn’t the offense, but how the team’s all-time league-leading defense — the Courage have conceded just 17 goals all season — was able to shut down a Chicago attack that for 45 minutes looked like it was capable of anything.

“We were getting picked apart in the first half,” said North Carolina coach Paul Riley. “Morgan Brian was getting the ball. [Danielle] Colaprico, [Vanessa] DiBernardo, they were hurting us bad. [Yuki] Nagasato was getting in between lines. She caused us a lot of problems tonight and then we just backed off, dropped 30 yards deeper than we normally do.”

That choice to drop off was an unusual move for a team largely defined by their ability to run relentlessly at opponents, and against a Red Stars side that didn’t seem to be bothered by North Carolina’s usual pressure, it proved the right one. The first half saw Chicago repeatedly break the first line of pressure in the midfield, with Brian often able to beat multiple defenders to find a forward pass. The attacking duo of Sam Kerr and Nagasato looked as dangerous as they have all season, and Kerr had a handful of excellent chances, including one shot that went off the post in the ninth minute.

“We just couldn’t figure out their shape in the first half,” said Courage center back Abby Erceg. “Especially when you’re trying to do it on the fly, during the game, it’s very difficult. Paul [Riley] helped us out a little bit with that, thankfully.”

The game changed completely in the second half. Kerr and Nagasato, so dynamic as an attacking duo for the first 45 minutes, couldn’t find each other. “We dropped off a little bit just to make sure they weren’t getting in behind us,” said Erceg. “They were getting a lot of chances, their midfield was getting behind our midfield and it was causing a lot of problems. We changed it and it worked out in the second half.”

“As the game got stretched in the second half,” said Red Stars coach Rory Dames, “we couldn’t get anybody up high enough with [Kerr] to give her any sort of support. … We needed to be able to keep the ball and get the ball moving a little bit more.” Unable to find space between North Carolina’s lines, Chicago often resorted to long upfield passes, many of which weren’t successful — but even then, Kerr was able to get on the end of a few optimistic services. That’s where North Carolina’s last line of defense stepped in.

“I think the Abbys [Erceg and Dahlkemper] did a good job of having one tight to her and one covering,” said Dames. Their smart positioning, together with some excellent one-on-one defending by both players, contained the relatively few looks Kerr found in the second half.

“Sam Kerr was frighteningly good today,” said Riley, “and [Erceg] and Dahlkemper dealt with her. Their partnership has been fantastic this year. … Abby Erceg, we got her from Chicago a couple years ago and she’s just elevated her game, fitness-wise, professionally, technically. She’s better than she used to be, great leader. In the locker room, she’s just amazing. I hope she’s defender of the year because she absolutely, you look at who deserves it? Becky [Sauerbrunn] deserved it, [Julie Ertz] probably deserved it other years, but absolutely hands down, there’s no question for me.”

Midfielder Sam Mewis echoed Riley’s praise. “Our center backs are so good,” she said. “They’re both up for defender of the year, right? Which I think is so deserved, they’re both world-class defenders.”

Asked what it’s like defending one of the world’s best forwards in Kerr, Erceg was straightforward. “It sucks,” she laughed. “She’s very good, she’s so good. You can watch footage of her all day, but she’s so dynamic in the way she plays, she’s not predictable which makes it very difficult to mark her. That’s one of the trademarks of her game. She can pull a goal out of nothing, which makes her dangerous all over the field, so we really wanted to shut her down today.”

Between strong individual performances from the defense and the mid-game adjustments to their overall game plan, North Carolina did just that. Ultimately, it was an approach that allowed the Courage to be effective offensively as well, giving the team a look that almost harkened back to the Western New York Flash days, when blazing-fast attacks in transition were the team’s most powerful weapon.

Ultimately, it was a wonder goal by Mewis, sent to the far post from 30 yards out, that put the game to bed in the 86th minute. Chicago had already been looking tired and frustrated, and after that, it was all over. “It came at a good time,” said Mewis. “It allowed us to definitely sit back, we didn’t need to get another goal and stretch the lead at all. … I think all it really did was allow us to sit in, keep them out, go to the corners, and finish the game out.”

Heading into a rematch of last year’s championship, against a Portland Thorns side whose offense has looked unstoppable in recent weeks, the team’s ability to adjust in a way they haven’t done in the regular season could prove to be a crucial asset.

“We’re really motivated,” said Mewis of the upcoming final. “We’ve been thinking about this all year, and we’re excited to just come out and try and perform and I think it’s going be a great match, for the league, for women’s soccer. It’s going to be exciting.”

U.S. names 20-woman roster for Concacaf Women’s Championship

The United States will take on Mexico, Trinidad & Tobago and Panama in the group stage of the tournament

The United States will first face Mexico on October 4. (Photo credit: Robin Alam/isiphotos.com)

U.S. women’s national team head coach Jill Ellis has named the 20-woman roster for the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship in October. U.S. Soccer announced the roster on Wednesday. The tournament, Concacaf’s qualifying tournament for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France, will take place October 4-17.

The roster is only 20 players, down from the 23 were selected the last time out for the U.S. in their pair of friendlies vs. Chile, and three less than would be on a World Cup squad next summer.

U.S. WNT Concacaf Women’s Championship Roster by Position (Caps/Goals):

GOALKEEPERS (2): Ashlyn Harris (Orlando Pride; 17/0), Alyssa Naeher (Chicago Red Stars; 33/0)

DEFENDERS (7): Abby Dahlkemper (North Carolina Courage; 23/0), Crystal Dunn (North Carolina Courage; 69/23), Hailie Mace (UCLA; 2/0), Kelley O’Hara (Utah Royals FC; 108/2), Becky Sauerbrunn (Utah Royals FC; 143/0), Casey Short (Chicago Red Stars; 25/0), Emily Sonnett (Portland Thorns FC; 21/0)

MIDFIELDERS (5): Morgan Brian (Chicago Red Stars; 79/6), Julie Ertz (Chicago Red Stars; 66/16), Lindsey Horan (Portland Thorns FC; 56/6), Rose Lavelle (Washington Spirit; 13/3), Samantha Mewis (North Carolina Courage; 38/7)

FORWARDS (6): Tobin Heath (Portland Thorns FC; 138/21), Carli Lloyd (Sky Blue FC; 259/102), Alex Morgan (Orlando Pride; 147/90), Christen Press (Utah Royals FC; 104/45), Mallory Pugh (Washington Spirit; 37/12), Megan Rapinoe (Seattle Reign FC; 140/38)

 

U.S. Soccer noted that Courage midfielder McCall Zerboni (left elbow fracture) and Stanford defender Tierna Davidson (left ankle fracture) were not available for selection due to injury. U.S. Soccer also said that Thorns goalkeeper Adrianna Franch and Courage defender Merritt Mathias would train with the team to assist in preparation ahead of the matches.

Group A of the tournament will feature the United States, Mexico, Trinidad & Tobago and Panama. Group A games will be played at Sahlen’s Stadium at WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary, North Carolina. Group B will feature Canada, Jamaica, Costa Rica and Cuba. Group B games will take place at H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas.

The semifinals, third-place game and championship games will be held at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas. The top three teams will automatically qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France. The fourth-place finisher will head to a home-and-away playoff with Argentina for a spot in next summer’s tournament.


Schedule:

 

October 4

Sahlen’s Stadium in Cary, North Carolina

Trinidad & Tobago vs. Panama | 5 p.m. ET

United States vs. Mexico | 7:30 p.m. ET

 

October 5

H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas

Costa Rica vs. Cuba | 6 p.m. ET

Canada vs. Jamaica | 8:30 p.m. ET

 

October 7

Sahlen’s Stadium in Cary, North Carolina

Panama vs. United States | 5 p.m. ET

Mexico vs. Trinidad & Tobago | 7:30 p.m. ET

 

October 8

H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas

Jamaica vs. Costa Rica | 6 p.m. ET

Cuba vs. Canada | 8:30 p.m. ET

 

October 10

Sahlen’s Stadium in Cary, North Carolina

Panama vs. Mexico | 5 p.m. ET

Trinidad & Tobago vs. United States | 7:30 p.m. ET

 

October 11

H-E-B Park in Edinburg, Texas

Cuba vs. Jamaica | 7:30 p.m. ET

Costa Rica vs. Canada | 10 p.m. ET

 

October 14

Toyota Stadium; Frisco, Texas

2nd A vs. 1st B | 5 p.m. ET*

1st A vs. 2nd B | 8 p.m. ET*

* Order of semifinal matches may be switched to accommodate broadcasters

 

October 17

Toyota Stadium; Frisco, Texas

Third-place match | 5 p.m. ET

Championship | 8 p.m. ET

 

 


Ticket info via U.S. Soccer:

CARY, N.C.

Tickets for the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship Group A doubleheaders featuring the U.S. Women’s National Team, Mexico, Trinidad & Tobago and Panama on Oct. 4, 7 and 10 in Cary, N.C., are currently on sale through ussoccer.com and by phone at 1-800-745-3000. Tickets will not be sold at the stadium except on the day of each event.

EDINBURG, TEXAS

Tickets for the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship Group B doubleheaders featuring Canada, Jamaica, Costa Rica and Cuba on Oct. 5, 8 and 11 in Edinburg, Texas, go on sale Thursday, Sept. 6, at 10 a.m. CT through ussoccer.com and by phone at 1-800-745-3000. Tickets will not be sold at the stadium except on the day of each event.

FRISCO, TEXAS

Tickets for the semifinals, Third-Place Match and the Championship Game at the 2018 Concacaf Women’s Championship are currently on sale through ussoccer.com, by phone at 1-855-492-8053 and at the Toyota Stadium Ticket Office.

Groups of 20 or more can order directly at ussoccer.com.

Coaches Circle and Presidents Circle members supporting the U.S. Soccer Development Fund can receive individual customer support and concierge services for their ticketing needs. Click here or contact circles@ussoccer.org for more information.

Courage, Thorns to meet in 2018 NWSL Championship; Broadcast, ticket info

Courage vs. Thorns on Saturday at 4:30 p.m. ET on Lifetime

The North Carolina Courage and Portland Thorns FC will meet Saturday at Providence Park in the 2018 NWSL Championship, a rematch of last year’s final.

 

Saturday, September 22 at 4:30 p.m. ET on Lifetime

NWSL Championship

Providence Park in Portland, Oregon

Tickets to the 2018 NWSL Championship match are on sale by calling (888) 736-6849 or online

The final will be streamed live via the Lifetime App, with authentication required in the United States. International fans will be able to watch every game on the NWSL app and NWSLsoccer.com.

Franch’s big saves kept Portland in the game

Adrianna Franch made four saves in Portland's semifinal win over Seattle

Portland Thorns FC goalkeeper Adrianna Franch made four saves on Saturday vs. Seattle Reign FC. (Photo credit: Craig Mitchelldyer/isiphotos.com)

Portland, Oregon — In the playoffs, the margins between winners and losers can be razor-thin, and so it was yesterday when Seattle Reign FC went to Portland for a semifinal against their Cascadia rivals. In a first half when Portland Thorns FC admit they didn’t play their best soccer, it was often one player — goalkeeper Adrianna Franch — keeping the home team in the game.

“I thought AD was incredible in the first half,” said Reign coach Vlatko Andonovski. “I was actually afraid, thinking to myself, walking to the locker room, ‘What do we need to do to score a goal?'”

This semifinal was a rematch of last week’s regular-season showdown, which saw Portland dominate their rivals; yesterday, things played out differently from the start. “Seattle came in super aggressive, and really working hard, and they played well,” said Portland coach Mark Parsons. “For us, the biggest difference was we weren’t getting the pressure. We weren’t competing.”

With Seattle coming out swinging from the starting whistle and often pinning Portland into their own half, the numerical discrepancies between the two teams were stark in the first half. Seattle out-possessed Portland 59.8% to 40.2% and took 13 shots to Portland’s eight.

After knocking on the door for much of the half, Seattle finally found the game’s first goal in the 29th minute when Jasmyne Spencer crashed the far post on a Megan Rapinoe free kick and one-timed the ball, which had ricocheted off the crossbar, into the net. For the next 15 minutes, it would be Franch who kept the Thorns in contention.

“We had some great opportunities first half,” said Reign forward Jodie Taylor. “We exploited some weaknesses and managed to create a lot of chances, but AD’s such a good goalkeeper. … I had two really great chances that I hit well, but not good enough to beat AD.”

Franch’s first big save came in the 33rd minute. Taylor struck a beautiful volley from the top of the penalty arc that curved gracefully as it flew towards goal, looking sure to land in the back of the net—but the Thorns keeper, despite initially stepping the wrong direction, dove right at the last minute to get a hand on the ball and deflect it out for a corner kick.

In the 37th minute, Franch would be tested again, this time when Taylor spun to beat Emily Sonnett near the six-yard line, this one a low driven effort. Franch dove to the ground to make another eye-popping reflex save. Just two minutes later, she dove backwards and blocked an attempt by Rapinoe, who had beaten Ellie Carpenter around the inside to get on the end of a cross from Theresa Nielsen, with her right foot.

“She’s incredible,” said Portland midfielder Tobin Heath. “The kind of saves that she makes in big-time moments — she’s a gamer, you know. It’s really cool to have someone like that on your team.”

Those missed opportunities by Seattle kept Portland in the game long enough for Heath to score the 43rd-minute equalizer, assisted by Lindsey Horan, which set the stage for a Portland comeback in the second half. “I think if we’d snuck in a couple extra, you know, if we were going into the half at three goals, 3-1, it would have been a different game,” said Taylor.

“At halftime I think we all knew,” said Parsons, “we needed to compete, we needed to claw our way back into this game, because no one was going to give it to us. … And wow, were they better in the second half.”

“We got at them,” said Franch of the turnaround in the second half. “We started pressing a little bit more, like we normally do, not allowing them to send in balls from deep. .. if they were pressing, we put the ball long, and if they did drop off we had to play.” The Thorns picked up momentum throughout the half, until they finally found the go-ahead goal in the 77th minute when Horan headed in a service by Christine Sinclair.

Beyond those crucial 15 minutes in the first half, Franch repeatedly demonstrated her ability in the air, leaping to catch crosses and corner kicks that most keepers would be content to deflect away. Aside from Rapinoe’s perfectly-hit free kick on the Reign goal, which skipped past her fingertips, she claimed just about every service Rapinoe sent in out of the air.

“There’s no one, I’d say in the league,” said Parsons, “and I’ll rely on Nadine [Angerer, the Thorns goalkeeping coach] to say the world. There’s no one in the world that can do what she did in the first 45 minutes.”

Franch’s partnership with Angerer, the legendary former German international who became the only goalkeeper ever to be named FIFA World Player of the Year, has been key to her development as a player since arriving in Portland in 2016. “Her ceiling is nowhere near,” Parsons said. “Working in this environment with our staff and Nadine, what Britt Eckerstrom continues to give to that environment, and Bella [Geist]. … [I’m] just proud of the growth that she continues to make and what she does in big games and big moments.”

For Franch, saves like the ones she made today are all in a day’s work, something she downplays in favor of talking about the overall team performance. “You want to try to keep the ball out of the back of the net and be there for your team,” she said after the game. “That’s what I tried to do. It was enough in the first half, and the team stepped up and took care of the second for a team performance across the board.”

2018 NWSL Awards Finalists

Voting is now open

The 2018 finalists for Most Valuable Player, Defender of the Year, Goalkeeper of the Year, Rookie of the Year and Coach of the Year have now been announced. Voting is now open and will continue for owners, general managers, coaches, players, media and fans until Tuesday, September 18 at 11:59 p.m. ET.

The list of finalists was decided after a preliminary round of voting by owners, general managers, coaches, players and media.

The final round of voting will determine the individual award winners and Best XI.

Voting Breakdown:
Preliminary Round: Owners/GMs/Coaches (25%), Media (25%) and Players (50%)
Final Round: Fans (20%), Owners/GMs/Coaches (20%), Media (20%) and Players (40%)

VOTE NOW



2018 NWSL Awards – Finalists

Coach of the Year

 

Vlatko Andonovski, Seattle Reign FC

In his first year as coach of Seattle Reign FC, Vlatko Andonovski coached the Reign to their first playoff appearance since 2015. The Reign finished 11-5-8 with 41 points to capture third place in the NWSL and went 7-1-4 at home. The Reign finished the year with the second-best goals against average in league history (.79), allowing 19 goals in 24 games. Their 12 clean sheets tied the NWSL record.

Mark Parsons, Portland Thorns FC

In 2018, Mark Parsons and Portland Thorns FC finished in second place in the NWSL for the second straight year, earning their third straight postseason appearance, and third straight home semifinal game. Their 12-6-6 record (42 points) also marked their third straight season with 12 wins or more. The Thorns went 7-1-1 down the stretch and won the No. 2 seed in their regular season finale with a 3-1 win over Seattle Reign FC. Portland’s 40 goals and +12 goal differential were second in the NWSL.

Paul Riley, North Carolina Courage

In 2018, Paul Riley and the North Carolina Courage won the NWSL Shield for the second consecutive season. The Courage finished the regular season with a 17-1-6 record, setting NWSL records for most wins (17), points (57), fewest losses (1), most goals scored (53), fewest goals allowed (17), goals against average (.71) and largest goal differential (+36). They also became the first team in NWSL history to go unbeaten on the road for an entire season.

 


Rookie of the Year 

Imani Dorsey, Sky Blue FC 

After making her NWSL debut on June 8, Sky Blue FC forward Imani Dorsey appeared in 13 games for Sky Blue, earning 1,047 minutes and making 12 starts. She recorded 4 goals, 1 assist, 16 shots on target and 11 chances created, while posting a 74.4% passing accuracy (332 passes).

Savannah McCaskill, Sky Blue FC

Sky Blue FC midfielder Savannah McCaskill appeared in 20 matches, 17 starts, and played 1,510 minutes. She scored 3 goals and 3 assists, with 12 shots on target and a 68.5% passing accuracy (581 passes). Her 37 chances created ranked 11th in the league.

 Andi Sullivan, Washington Spirit

Washington Spirit midfielder Andi Sullivan led all rookies with 1,984 minutes. In 23 games (22 starts), she held a 78.9% passing accuracy (988 passes), and added 34 interceptions, 33 tackles won and 1 assist.

 

End of season statistical league leaders are available here.

More stats are also available on each player’s page on the NWSL site: Imani Dorsey, Savannah McCaskill, Andi Sullivan

 


Goalkeeper of the Year

Aubrey Bledsoe, Washington Spirit

Washington Spirit goalkeeper Aubrey Bledsoe finished tied for first in the NWSL with 108 saves, a new NWSL record. She posted 4 clean sheets and held a 78.3% save percentage, conceding 30 goals over 21 games.

Adrianna Franch, Portland Thorns FC

Portland Thorns FC goalkeeper Adrianna Franch made 14 starts in 2018, posting 3 clean sheets. She made 45 saves, conceded 14 goals and held a save percentage of 76.3%.

Lydia Williams, Seattle Reign FC

Seattle Reign FC goalkeeper Lydia Williams earned 10 clean sheets, one shy of tying the NWSL record. She made 56 saves and allowed 11 goals over 16 games, posting a save percentage of 83.6%.

 

End of season statistical league leaders are available here.

More stats are also available on each player’s page on the NWSL site: Aubrey Bledsoe, Adrianna Franch, Lydia Williams

 


Defender of the Year

Abby Dahlkemper, North Carolina Courage

North Carolina Courage defender Abby Dahlkemper appeared in 19 games in 2018 for the league’s best-ranked defense. She made 60 clearances, 11 blocks, 20 interceptions, 8 tackles won and 39 duels won. She held a passing accuracy of 79.3% (885 passes).

Abby Erceg, North Carolina Courage

North Carolina Courage defender Abby Erceg played every minute (2,160) in 2018, one of five players to do so, as the Courage allowed the fewest goals in the league and earned 11 clean sheets. She made 110 clearances (2nd in the NWSL), 21 blocks (4th), 50 interceptions and 19 tackles won. She won 116 duels, including 81 aerial duels, which ranked 5th in the league. She held an 81.9% passing accuracy (1047 passes) and added 2 goals and 2 assists.

Julie Ertz, Chicago Red Stars 

Chicago Red Stars defender Julie Ertz played 1,126 minutes over 14 appearances in 2018. She recorded 54 clearances, 8 blocks, 22 interceptions, 9 tackles won and 63 duels won. She held a passing accuracy of 67.1% (468 passes).

Becky Sauerbrunn, Utah Royals FC

Utah Royals FC defender Becky Sauerbrunn played 1,720 minutes over 20 appearances in 2018, as Utah’s finished the season allowing the third-fewest goals in the league. She was the league’s most efficient passer (minimum 400 pass attempts) with an 86.23% passing accuracy over 1,046 passes. Her 18 blocks ranked 5th in the NWSL and 90 clearances ranked 10th in the NWSL. She also had 20 tackles won, 78 duels won, and 49 interceptions.

Emily Sonnett, Portland Thorns FC

Portland Thorns FC defender Emily Sonnett played 1,755 minutes over 20 games in 2018 and her 104 clearances ranked third in the NWSL. She recorded 14 blocks, 35 interceptions, 18 tackles won and 68 duels won. She also had one goal and one assist, and held a 77.8% passing accuracy (886 passes).

 

End of season statistical league leaders are available here.

More stats are also available on each player’s page on the NWSL site: Abby Dahlkemper, Abby Erceg, Julie Ertz, Becky Sauerbrunn, Emily Sonnett

 


Most Valuable Player

Lindsey Horan, Portland Thorns FC

Portland Thorns FC midfielder Lindsey Horan played 1,980 minutes over 22 games as the Thorns went 12-6-6 (42 points) and finished second in the NWSL. She scored 13 goals (3rd in the NWSL) and added 2 assists, scoring at a rate of 152.3 minutes per goal in 30 shots on target. She led the league in total touches (1,852) and duels won (297), including aerial duels (141), which was also first in the league. She also had 47 tackles won (tied for 4th in the NWSL), 42 headed clearances (3rd). She recorded 25 chances created and held a passing accuracy of 75.2% (1,293 passes).

Sam Kerr, Chicago Red Stars

Chicago Red Stars forward Sam Kerr played 1,704 minutes over 19 games for the Red Stars as the team finished fourth in the NWSL with a 9-5-10 record (37 points). Her 16 goals lead the league, and she added 4 assists. Her 40 chances created tied for 9th in the NWSL. She scored at a rate of 106.5 minutes per goal in 47 shots on target. She won 129 duels, tied for 12th in the league, 70 of which were aerial duels, 9th in the NWSL.

Megan Rapinoe, Seattle Reign FC

Seattle Reign FC forward Megan Rapinoe played 1,315 minutes over 16 games for the Reign as they finished third in the NWSL with an 11-5-8 record and 41 points. She scored 7 goals (tied for 10th) and had 6 assists (tied for 4th in the league). She scored at a rate of 187.9 minutes per goal in 37 shots on target. Her 41 chances created ranked 8th in the NWSL and 27 successful crosses/corners ranked 6th in the NWSL. She won 114 duels, 31 in the air.

Lynn Williams, North Carolina Courage

North Carolina Courage forward Lynn Williams played 1,707 minutes over 21 games for the Courage as North Carolina finished first in the NWSL with a 17-1-6 record (57 points). Her 14 goals ranked second in the NWSL, scoring at a rate of 121.9 minutes per goal in 41 shots on target. She added 5 assists and 29 chances created. She won 116 duels, 54 of which were aerial duels.

McCall Zerboni, North Carolina Courage

North Carolina Courage midfielder McCall Zerboni played 1,800 minutes over 20 games for the Courage, as North Carolina posted a 17-1-6 record (57 points) and finished first in the league. She led the league in tackles won with 63 and finished second in interceptions with 70. She won 203 duels, third best in the NWSL, 47 of which were aerial duels. She finished 10th in total touches with 1,422. She also added 3 goals in 8 shots on target and 25 chances created. She held a passing accuracy of 75.9% (995 passes).

 

End of season statistical league leaders are available here.

More stats are also available on each player’s page on the NWSL site: Lindsey Horan, Sam Kerr, Megan Rapinoe, Lynn Williams, McCall Zerboni

Semifinal preview: Courage vs. Red Stars

Courage vs. Red Stars will take place on Tuesday night at 9 p.m. ET on ESPNews

The Courage and Red Stars played to a 1-1 draw the last time the two teams met in the regular season. (Photo credit: Daniel Bartel/isiphotos.com)

The North Carolina Courage and Chicago Red Stars will meet on Tuesday night at Providence Park in Portland, Oregon, in the second NWSL semifinal at 9 p.m. ET on ESPNews. (Buy Tickets)

The game was originally scheduled to be played on Sunday in North Carolina, home of the first-place Courage, but was moved to Portland due to Hurricane Florence. The league announced the change on Thursday. The winner will take on Portland Thorns FC on Saturday afternoon at Providence Park in the 2018 NWSL Championship.

Tuesday’s semifinal is a meeting of the NWSL’s best-ever regular season team in the Courage, and the league’s most prolific goal scorer in Red Stars forward Sam Kerr.

North Carolina set records for wins (17), points (57), most goals scored (53) and fewest goals allowed (17). The Courage finished the regular season at 17-1-6, unbeaten on the road, 15 points clear of second-place Portland Thorns FC and NWSL Shield winners for the second consecutive year. Their points per game average of 2.375 is the best in the history of not just the NWSL, but also any team in American women’s professional soccer history, besting the previous record set by the 2011 Western New York Flash of Women’s Professional Soccer.

“North Carolina has had a special season. Have a special team. You want to be the best, you’ve got to beat the best, so we’re excited about the opportunity to compete against them,” Red Stars coach Rory Dames said on a conference call with the media last week. “North Carolina’s the best women’s team that has played in a professional league in this country. They’ve statistically proven that. … So, all credit to them for what they’ve done, but we feel pretty good about our group as well.”

On the other side of the field, Kerr followed up last year’s record 17 goals with 16 this year, winning the Golden Boot for the second straight season. Her 16 goals and four assists came in 19 games after missing the first five games of the season because of international duty.

“I think [Kerr is] just one of those players that’s unstoppable at the moment. She’s in the top form of her career and she is unstoppable. She’s scoring in almost every single game,” Courage defender Abby Erceg said. “I think we just have to find a way to shut her down as best as possible. Some days, you’re going to be able to do it and some days, you’re not going to be able to do it. That’s how it goes with players like that. They’re just so good that they always find a way. But I enjoy the challenge. I like playing against players like that. They make you better. They make you think.”

Chicago claimed the fourth and final playoff spot, their fourth straight semifinal appearance, with a strong run down the stretch. The Red Stars are 8-2-3 in their last 13 games, with the only losses coming to the Courage in July and then Utah Royals FC in the regular season finale, when the Red Stars had already clinched the No. 4 seed.

Both teams have history to overcome this postseason. No Shield winner has ever won the title, including last year’s Courage team, which lost the final to Portland Thorns FC in the final. And the Red Stars have never made the NWSL Championship, losing in the semifinals the last three years, including a 1-0 loss in North Carolina last year on an 89th minute goal from Denise O’Sullivan last October.

While Kerr is new to the team, and has not been a part of those losses, she says the team is confident heading in the playoffs. “It doesn’t really play any emotion into this week. The girls have said around the team that they feel the most confident they ever have in this team, so that gives us confidence. I don’t think that’s something that the girls are thinking about.”

The Courage are 1-0-2 vs. the Red Stars this season, making Chicago just one of two teams to earn multiple points vs. the league leaders this season. This after the Red Stars went 3-0 vs. the Courage in the regular season last year before the playoff loss.

“I think they’re a very good side. To be honest with you, you don’t want to play anybody in the playoffs, but this is certainly one we would have liked to avoid,” Courage head coach Paul Riley said.

When the Courage take the field on Tuesday night, they’ll do so without one of their most important players in midfielder McCall Zerboni, who broke her elbow in the first minute of the U.S. women’s national team’s win over Chile on September 4. Zerboni, named an MVP Finalist on Sunday, finished the season first in tackles won, second in interceptions and third in duels won. When Red Stars goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher put up an impressive 11 saves vs. the Courage back in May, it was Zerboni who finally scored late to keep North Carolina’s then unbeaten streak alive.

McCall’s a huge part of their team. I’ve played with McCall, so I know how much she means to a team. When we were at Western New York five years ago she was a big part of our team,” Kerr said. “It’s disappointing. You want to play the best teams when you go into a semifinal, but I’m sure — North Carolina, they beat one of the best teams in the world with six of their players out [Olympique Lyon in the International Champions Cup Final], so they’re a resilient team.”

Even without Zerboni on the field, the game will still feature two MVP finalists in Kerr and Courage forward Lynn Williams, who finished 1-2 in this year’s Golden Boot race with 16 and 14 goals, respectively. Kerr’s goals came in just 19 games after missing the first part of the season on international duty. Williams caught fire down the stretch, scoring 13 goals in the final 14 of her 21 appearances. Both goal scorers are the only players to record a hat trick in the league this season.

North Carolina Courage vs. Chicago Red Stars will take place on Tuesday night at 9 p.m. ET on ESPNews from Providence Park in Portland, Oregon. (Buy Tickets)

Courage, Red Stars set to meet again in the NWSL Playoffs

The Courage and Red Stars will play on Tuesday night at 9 p.m. ET on ESPNews

Courage forward Debinha has scored in two of the three meetings with the Red Stars this year. (Photo credit: Daniel Bartel/isiphotos.com)

The North Carolina Courage and the Chicago Red Stars will meet at Providence Park in the 2018 NWSL Playoffs on Tuesday night (9 p.m. ET on ESPNews) for a rematch of the 2017 NWSL Playoffs. Last year, the Courage knocked out the Red Stars 1-0 to advance to the Championship — so this year, the two teams will battle it out once again for a ticket to the final.

This year’s Courage and Red Stars match-up has been dramatic — with the two teams tying twice and the Courage exploding for a 4-1 win over the Red Stars in July. While the Courage have the slight edge on the year, at 1-0-2, the Red Stars are hungry to make up for last year’s late-game playoff heartbreak and remain just one of two teams to pick up multiple points from the league leaders.

The semifinal was originally scheduled to be played on Sunday, Sept. 16 at the Courage’s Sahlen’s Stadium at WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary, North Carolina, but the game has been moved to Providence Park on Tuesday due to Hurricane Florence.

A look back at the 2018 Courage vs. Red Stars:

May 6: North Carolina Courage 1 | Chicago Red Stars 1

In the their first meeting since the 2017 NWSL playoffs, Chicago Red Stars goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher stole the show, collecting 11 saves to earn a point on the road. Golden Boot winner Sam Kerr scored her first goal in a Red Stars uniform to give her team a 1-0 lead in the 37th minute. For the Courage, it was midfielder McCall Zerboni who saved the Courage’s unbeaten streak scoring in the 82nd minute to level the game at 1-1. Watch the full game


July 4:  North Carolina Courage 4 | Chicago Red Stars 1

Four different Courage players scored to set off fireworks at WakeMed Soccer Park on the Fourth of July. The Courage earned their 12th win of the season led by goals from Crystal Dunn, Lynn Williams, Debinha and Kristen Hamilton. The Red Stars only goal came off of a penalty kick taken by Yuki Nagasato. Heather O’Reilly made her 2018 NWSL debut, when she entered the game in the 75th minute. Watch the full game


August 10: Chicago Red Stars 1 | North Carolina Courage 1

In their final regular season meeting of the year, the Red Stars and Courage played to a defensive draw. Debinha scored for the Courage in the 22nd minute, but Kerr equalized in the 64th minute to keep her team in the playoff hunt. Kerr almost scored her second of the night in extra time, but Courage defender Merritt Mathias made a defensive tackle to keep her team unbeaten record on the road. Watch the full game

 

Orlando Pride and head coach Tom Sermanni part ways

Pride and Sermanni mutually agreed to his departure

Tom Sermanni was named the Pride’s first head coach in October 2015. (Photo credit: Jeremy Reper/isiphotos.com)

The Orlando Pride and head coach Tom Sermanni have mutually agreed to part ways, the club announced on Friday.

Sermanni was named the Pride’s first head coach in 2015 and led the club to a 25-30-13 overall record throughout the course of the three seasons.

This season, the Pride went 8-10-6 and finished the regular season in seventh place. Last season, Sermanni led the Pride to their first playoff appearance. The Pride finished 2017 with a league-leading 45 goals scored.

“It’s been a great honor to be the inaugural coach of Orlando Pride and to be a part of this wonderful organization,” Sermanni said in the Pride’s press release. ” I’d like to thank all of our players, staff, fans and community for their tremendous support throughout my time here. I want to wish the team and the organization great success moving forward. I look forward to being an avid supporter and following the Club’s fortunes.”

The search for a new head coach for the Pride will begin immediately.

Courage vs. Red Stars semifinal to be played Tuesday night at Providence Park

Courage vs. Red Stars will now take place on Tuesday at 9 p.m. ET at Providence Park

The 2018 NWSL Playoffs Semifinal game between the North Carolina Courage and Chicago Red Stars will now be played on Tuesday night at 9 p.m. ET at Providence Park in Portland, Oregon, on ESPNews, the NWSL announced on Thursday afternoon.

The game was originally scheduled for Sunday at 3 p.m. ET at Sahlen’s Stadium at WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary, North Carolina, but has been moved due to Hurricane Florence. Tickets to the game will be $10 general admission tickets. The winner of the game will advance to the 2018 NWSL Championship, which will take place on Saturday, September 22, at 4:30 p.m. ET, also at Providence Park in Portland. 

Full NWSL news release on the schedule change:

CHICAGO (Sept. 13, 2018) – The National Women’s Soccer League (NWSL) announced today that the North Carolina Courage vs. Chicago Red Stars semifinal game on Sunday, Sept. 16 has been moved due to the pending arrival of Hurricane Florence.

Due to uncertainty of the impact of the storm in North Carolina, the NWSL worked in partnership with North Carolina Courage and Chicago Red Stars to make the decision in the best interests of the safety and well-being of fans, players and staff.

The semifinal game has been rescheduled for Tuesday, Sept. 18 at 9 p.m. ET and will be broadcast live on ESPNews and streamed live on the ESPN App from Providence Park in Portland, Ore.

Tickets for the NWSL Semifinal match will be $10 general admission and are now on sale by calling (888) 736-6849 or online at https://nwsl.us/2Ogbz3Z.   

 NWSL’s international fans will be able to watch the game on the NWSL app and NWSLsoccer.com.”

Thorns, Reign set to meet one last time in 2018

The Thorns will host the Reign on Saturday afternoon at 3 p.m. ET on Lifetime

When Portland Thorns FC and Seattle Reign FC meet in the 2018 NWSL Playoffs on Saturday afternoon (3 p.m. ET on Lifetime), it’ll be the 20th all-time meeting between the two sides — but the first time they’ve ever met in the postseason.

The all-time series is even at 8-8-3 between the Thorns and Reign — with the Reign holding a 2-1-0 edge in 2018. Every game this season has been a memorable, dramatic affair. With a ticket to the 2018 NWSL Championship — which will be held at Providence Park as well — on the line, Saturday’s game should be no different.

A look back at the 2018 Cascadia Rivalry:

 

May 5: Portland Thorns FC 2 | Seattle Reign FC 3

In one of the best NWSL regular season games ever, the Reign beat the Thorns 3-2 at Providence Park. The Reign took the lead twice, only for the Thorns to equalize both times. But Rumi Utsugi scored the game-winner in the 75th minute and Michelle Betos made a handful of saves down the stretch to preserve the win. Watch the full game


June 30: Seattle Reign FC 1 | Portland Thorns FC 0

Thorns goalkeeper Adrianna Franch made eight saves, including a leaping snag on a shot by Megan Rapinoe in the 87th minute, the Reign won 1-0 at home after a late goal by Jodie Taylor. Rapinoe set up the play with a cross into the box that found Taylor open for the game-winner. Watch the full game


September 7: Portland Thorns FC 3 | Seattle Reign FC 1

And then last week, Round 3. Jess Fishlock gave the Reign a 1-0 lead in the fourth minute, but the Thorns stormed back thanks to a brace from Lindsey Horan and the eventual game-winner from Tobin Heath in the 49th minute. A sell-out crowd of 21,144 was on hand at Providence Park for the Thorns win, which clinched the No. 2 seed for Portland, and set up Saturday’s meeting with a trip to the NWSL Championship on the line. Watch the full game

League Leaders

NWSL league leaders in a number of statistical categories at the end of the 2018 regular season

2018 NWSL Ball (Photo credit: Mike Lawrence/isiphotos.com)

NWSL league leaders in a number of statistical categories, as of September 11, 2018 — the end of the 2018 regular season.

All stats are courtesy of Opta, and there is a key to the terms at the bottom of this story. 

 

Also — additional advanced stats from Opta can be found on every player page, team page and game info page.

Past League Leader posts can be found herehere and here.

 

Minutes Played

1. Erceg, Abby | NC | 2160
Campbell, Jane | HOU | 2160
Brooks, Amber | HOU | 2160
Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 2160
Sinclair, Christine | POR | 2160
6. Daly, Rachel | HOU | 2155
7. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 2131
8. Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 2088
Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 2088
10. Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 2070
Sheridan, Kailen | NJ | 2070
12. Smith, Taylor | WAS | 2064
13. Naughton, Katie | CHI | 2059
14. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 2040
15. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 2032
16. Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 2003
17. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 1984
18. Naeher, Alyssa | CHI | 1980
Horan, Lindsey | POR | 1980
20. Mathias, Merritt | NC | 1961
21. Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 1948
22. Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 1927
23. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 1905
24. Church, Whitney | WAS | 1898
25. Harris, Ashlyn | ORL | 1890
Bledsoe, Aubrey | WAS | 1890
Johnson, Estelle | WAS | 1890
28. Moros, Becca | UTA | 1868
29. Freeman, Mandy | NJ | 1826
30. Scott, Desiree | UTA | 1810
31. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 1800
Zerboni, McCall | NC | 1800
Dunn, Crystal| NC |1800
Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 1800
35. Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 1788
36. Hinkle, Jaelene | NC | 1779
37. Sonnett, Emily | POR | 1755
38. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 1752
39. Klingenberg, Meghan | POR | 1751
40. Debinha | NC | 1728
41. Sauerbrunn, Becky | UTA | 1720
42. van Wyk, Janine | HOU | 1719
43. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 1715
44. Dahlkemper, Abby | NC | 1710
45. Long, Allie | SEA | 1709
46. Williams, Lynn | NC | 1707
47. Kerr, Sam | CHI | 1704
48. McDonald, Jessica | NC | 1686
49. Barnes, Lauren | SEA | 1679
50. Krieger, Ali | ORL | 1675
Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 1658
Skroski, Erica | NJ | 1654
Nielsen, Theresa | SEA | 1654
Rowland, Katelyn | NC | 1620
Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 1607
Boureille, Celeste | POR | 1586
Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 1563
Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 1542
Groom, Shea | NJ | 1535
Smith, Abby | UTA | 1512
McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 1510
Morgan, Alex | ORL | 1500
Hanson, Haley | HOU | 1464
Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 1450

Games Played

1. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 24
Daly, Rachel | HOU | 24
Killion, Sarah | NJ | 24
Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 24
Brooks, Amber | HOU | 24
Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 24
Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 24
Sinclair, Christine | POR | 24
Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 24
Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 24
Campbell, Jane | HOU | 24
Erceg, Abby | NC | 24
13. Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 23
Naughton, Katie | CHI | 23
Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 23
Sheridan, Kailen | NJ | 23
Dougherty Howard, Meggie | WAS | 23
Smith, Taylor | WAS | 23
Stengel, Katie | UTA | 23
Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 23
McDonald, Jessica | NC | 23
Hamilton, Kristen | NC | 23
Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 23
Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 23
Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 23
26. Naeher, Alyssa | CHI | 22
Spencer, Jasmyne | SEA | 22
O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 22
Horan, Lindsey | POR | 22
Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 22
Church, Whitney | WAS | 22
Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 22
Moros, Becca | UTA | 22
Tiernan, Madison | NJ | 22
Dunn, Crystal | NC | 22
Mathias, Merritt | NC | 22
37. Bledsoe, Aubrey | WAS | 21
Ubogagu, Chioma | ORL | 21
Groom, Shea | NJ | 21
Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 21
Scott, Desiree | UTA | 21
Boureille, Celeste | POR | 21
Matheson, Diana | UTA | 21
Williams, Lynn | NC | 21
Harris, Ashlyn | ORL | 21
Debinha | NC | 21
Hill, Rachel | ORL | 21
Freeman, Mandy | NJ | 21
Latsko, Veronica | HOU | 21
Johnson, Estelle | WAS | 21

 

Goals

1. Kerr, Sam | CHI | 16
2. Williams, Lynn | NC | 14
3. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 13
4. Daly, Rachel | HOU | 10
5. Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 9
Sinclair, Christine | POR | 9
7. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 8
Debinha | NC | 8
Dunn, Crystal | NC | 8
10. McDonald, Jessica | NC | 7
Heath, Tobin | POR | 7
Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 7
13. Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 6
Stengel, Katie | UTA | 6
15. Morgan, Alex | ORL | 5
Ohai, Kealia | HOU | 5
Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 5
Crnogorčević, Ana-Maria | POR | 5
Rodriguez, Amy | UTA | 5
20. Dorsey, Imani | NJ | 4
Hill, Rachel | ORL | 4
Marta | ORL | 4
Latsko, Veronica | HOU | 4
Johnson, Katie | NJ | 4
Ubogagu, Chioma | ORL | 4
Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 4
Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 4
Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 4
29. McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 3
Hamilton, Kristen | NC | 3
Zerboni, McCall | NC | 3
Long, Allie | SEA | 3
Mewis, Samantha | NC | 3
Mathias, Merritt | NC | 3
Ordega, Francisca | WAS | 3
36. Kgatlana, Thembi | HOU | 2
Tiernan, Madison | NJ | 2
Erceg, Abby | NC | 2
DiBernardo, Vanessa | CHI | 2
Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 2
Killion, Sarah | NJ | 2
Yanez, Beverly | SEA | 2
Press, Christen | UTA | 2
Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 2
Simon, Kyah | HOU | 2
Groom, Shea | NJ | 2
Ratcliffe, Brittany | UTA | 2
Matheson, Diana | UTA | 2
Mewis, Kristie | HOU | 2
Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 2
Raso, Hayley | POR | 2
Pugh, Mallory | WAS | 2

 

Assists

1. McDonald, Jessica | NC | 8
2. Heath, Tobin | POR | 7
Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 7
4. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 6
Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 6
Sinclair, Christine | POR | 6
7. Williams, Lynn | NC | 5
Dunn, Crystal | NC | 5
9. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 4
Ohai, Kealia | HOU | 4
Marta | ORL | 4
Hamilton, Kristen | NC | 4
Hinkle, Jaelene | NC | 4
Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 4
Nairn, Christine | ORL | 4
Kerr, Sam | CHI | 4
17. Kgatlana, Thembi | HOU | 3
McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 3
O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 3
Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 3
Crnogorčević, Ana-Maria | POR | 3
Groom, Shea | NJ | 3
Catley, Steph | SEA | 3
Kawasumi, Nahomi | SEA | 3
25. Morgan, Alex | ORL | 2
Prince, Nichelle | HOU | 2
Debinha | NC | 2
Erceg, Abby | NC | 2
DiBernardo, Vanessa | CHI | 2
Latsko, Veronica | HOU | 2
Johnson, Katie | NJ | 2
Killion, Sarah | NJ | 2
Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 2
Press, Christen | UTA | 2
Horan, Lindsey | POR | 2
Oyster, Megan | SEA | 2
Simon, Kyah | HOU | 2
Daly, Rachel | HOU | 2
Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 2
Mewis, Samantha | NC | 2
Klingenberg, Meghan | POR | 2
Lytle, Taylor | UTA | 2
Krieger, Ali | ORL | 2
Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 2
Raso, Hayley | POR | 2
Mathias, Merritt | NC | 2
47. Dorsey, Imani | NJ | 1
Sonnett, Emily | POR | 1
Tiernan, Madison | NJ | 1
White, Rosie | CHI | 1
Westphal, Christen | SEA | 1
Elby, Brooke | CHI | 1
Bowen, Katie | UTA | 1
Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 1
Ubogagu, Chioma | ORL | 1
Jordan, Savannah | HOU | 1
Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 1
Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 1
Campbell, Jane | HOU | 1
Chapman, Allysha | HOU | 1
Rodríguez, Raquel | NJ | 1
Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 1
Zerboni, McCall | NC | 1
Nielsen, Theresa | SEA | 1
Agnew, Lindsay | HOU | 1
Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 1
Rodriguez, Amy | UTA | 1
Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 1
Gorry, Katrina | UTA | 1
Solaun, Havana | WAS | 1
Matheson, Diana | UTA | 1
Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 1
Long, Allie | SEA | 1
Addo, Elizabeth | SEA | 1
Hanson, Haley | HOU | 1
Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 1
Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 1
Tymrak, Erika | UTA | 1
Church, Whitney | WAS | 1
Smith, Taylor | WAS | 1
van Egmond, Emily | ORL | 1
Pugh, Mallory | WAS | 1
Lussi, Tyler | POR | 1

 

Total Shots (including blocked shots)

1. Williams, Lynn | NC | 120
2. Kerr, Sam | CHI | 109
3. Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 86
4. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 78
5. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 77
6. McDonald, Jessica | NC | 75
Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 75
8. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 64
9. Daly, Rachel | HOU | 63
10. Debinha | NC | 62
11. Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 59
12. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 56
13. Sinclair, Christine | POR | 53
14. Morgan, Alex | ORL | 51
Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 51
16. Rodriguez, Amy | UTA | 46
Mewis, Samantha | NC | 46
18. Marta | ORL | 44
19. Press, Christen | UTA | 41
20. Groom, Shea | NJ | 39
21. Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 37
Crnogorčević, Ana-Maria | POR | 37
23. Heath, Tobin | POR | 36
Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 36
25. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 35
Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 35
27. Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 34
Stengel, Katie | UTA | 34
Ordega, Francisca | WAS | 34
30. Ohai, Kealia | HOU | 31
O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 31
32. McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 30
33. Dorsey, Imani | NJ | 29
Ubogagu, Chioma | ORL | 29
35. Johnson, Katie | NJ | 28
36. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 27
Hamilton, Kristen | NC | 27
38. Yanez, Beverly | SEA | 26
Simon, Kyah | HOU | 26
40. Erceg, Abby | NC | 25
Pugh, Mallory | WAS | 25
42. Latsko, Veronica | HOU | 24
Gorry, Katrina | UTA | 24
44. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 23
Banini, Estefanía | WAS | 23
46. DiBernardo, Vanessa | CHI | 22
Long, Allie | SEA | 21
48. Hill, Rachel | ORL | 20
Prince, Nichelle | HOU | 20
Spencer, Jasmyne | SEA | 20

 

Total Shots (excluding blocked shots)

1. Williams, Lynn | NC | 95
2. Kerr, Sam | CHI | 88
3. Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 68
4. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 65
5. McDonald, Jessica | NC | 59
Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 59
7. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 53
8. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 52
Daly, Rachel | HOU | 52
10. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 51
11. Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 47
12. Debinha | NC | 42
13. Rodriguez, Amy | UTA | 41
14. Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 40
15. Morgan, Alex | ORL | 38
16. Press, Christen | UTA | 34
Crnogorčević, Ana-Maria | POR | 34
Groom, Shea | NJ | 34
Mewis, Samantha | NC | 34
20. Sinclair, Christine | POR | 33
21. Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 31
22. Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 30
23. Marta | ORL | 29
Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 29
Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 29
26. Heath, Tobin | POR | 28
27. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 26
Ordega, Francisca | WAS | 26
29. Dorsey, Imani | NJ | 25
McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 25
Stengel, Katie | UTA | 25
32. Johnson, Katie | NJ | 24
33. Ohai, Kealia | HOU | 22
Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 22
35. Ubogagu, Chioma | ORL | 21
Simon, Kyah | HOU | 21
37. Erceg, Abby | NC | 20
Yanez, Beverly | SEA | 20
39. Latsko, Veronica | HOU | 19
Hamilton, Kristen | NC | 19
Pugh, Mallory | WAS | 19
42. Gorry, Katrina | UTA | 18
43. Prince, Nichelle | HOU | 17
O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 17
Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 17
46. Hill, Rachel | ORL | 16
Utsugi, Rumi | SEA | 16
Raso, Hayley | POR | 16
Spencer, Jasmyne | SEA | 16
Banini, Estefanía | WAS | 16

 

Shots on Target

1. Kerr, Sam | CHI | 47
2. Williams, Lynn | NC | 41
3. Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 37
4. Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 35
5. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 32
6. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 30
7. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 27
8. McDonald, Jessica | NC | 26
9. Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 24
10. Morgan, Alex | ORL | 23
Daly, Rachel | HOU | 23
12. Debinha | NC | 22
Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 22
14. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 21
15. Sinclair, Christine | POR | 20
16. Rodriguez, Amy | UTA | 19
17. Marta | ORL | 18
18. Press, Christen | UTA | 17
Heath, Tobin | POR | 17
20. Dorsey, Imani | NJ | 16
Crnogorčević, Ana-Maria | POR | 16
Mewis, Samantha | NC | 16
23. Groom, Shea | NJ | 15
Stengel, Katie | UTA | 15
25. Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 14
26. Ohai, Kealia | HOU | 13
Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 13
28. McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 12
Latsko, Veronica | HOU | 12
Johnson, Katie | NJ | 12
Hamilton, Kristen | NC | 12
Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 12
Ordega, Francisca | WAS | 12
34. Hill, Rachel | ORL | 10
35. White, Rosie | CHI | 9
Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 9
Gorry, Katrina | UTA | 9
Banini, Estefanía | WAS | 9
39. DiBernardo, Vanessa | CHI | 8
Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 8
Yanez, Beverly | SEA | 8
Ubogagu, Chioma | ORL | 8
Zerboni, McCall | NC | 8
Spencer, Jasmyne | SEA | 8
Pugh, Mallory | WAS | 8
46. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 7
Matheson, Diana | UTA | 7
Long, Allie | SEA | 7
Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 7
Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 7
Mathias, Merritt | NC | 7
Lussi, Tyler | POR | 7

 

Total Touches

1. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 1852
2. Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 1714
3. Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 1564
4. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 1558
5. Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 1548
6. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 1539
7. Moros, Becca | UTA | 1514
8. Hinkle, Jaelene | NC | 1462
9. Klingenberg, Meghan | POR | 1430
10. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 1422
11. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 1420
12. Smith, Taylor | WAS | 1363
13. Long, Allie | SEA | 1361
14. Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 1358
15. Erceg, Abby | NC | 1335
16. Barnes, Lauren | SEA | 1325
17. Daly, Rachel | HOU | 1313
18. Mathias, Merritt | NC | 1301
19. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 1299
20. Sauerbrunn, Becky | UTA | 1289
21. Nielsen, Theresa | SEA | 1257
22. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 1250
23. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 1247
24. Brooks, Amber | HOU | 1231
25. Naughton, Katie | CHI | 1230
Krieger, Ali | ORL | 1230
27. Sinclair, Christine | POR | 1228
28. Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 1224
29. Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 1212
30. Johnson, Estelle | WAS | 1171
31. Sonnett, Emily | POR | 1148
Scott, Desiree | UTA | 1148
33. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 1137
34. Church, Whitney | WAS | 1129
35. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 1124
36. Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 1112
37. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 1107
38. Dahlkemper, Abby | NC | 1105
39. Bowen, Katie | UTA | 1094
40. Campbell, Jane | HOU | 1091
41. Skroski, Erica | NJ | 1072
42. Naeher, Alyssa | CHI | 1065
43. Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 1063
44. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 1052
45. Catley, Steph | SEA | 1047
46. Debinha | NC | 1036
47. Sheridan, Kailen | NJ | 1033
48. Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 1021
49. Boureille, Celeste | POR | 1012
50. Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 1010

 

Touches in the Opp Box

1. Williams, Lynn | NC | 214
2. Kerr, Sam | CHI | 160
3. McDonald, Jessica | NC | 147
4. Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 132
5. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 125
6. Crnogorčević, Ana-Maria | POR | 106
7. Debinha | NC | 100
8. Morgan, Alex | ORL | 98
9. Daly, Rachel | HOU | 96
Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 96
11. Groom, Shea | NJ | 95
Sinclair, Christine | POR | 95
13. Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 89
14. Ordega, Francisca | WAS | 88
15. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 87
16. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 77
17. Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 76
18. Ubogagu, Chioma | ORL | 70
Heath, Tobin | POR | 70
20. Johnson, Katie | NJ | 67
Stengel, Katie | UTA | 67
22. Erceg, Abby | NC | 66
Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 66
24. Press, Christen | UTA | 65
Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 65
26. Pugh, Mallory | WAS | 61
27. Latsko, Veronica | HOU | 59
28. Marta | ORL | 58
Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 58
30. Ohai, Kealia | HOU | 57
Hamilton, Kristen | NC | 57
32. Yanez, Beverly | SEA | 54
33. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 52
Rodriguez, Amy | UTA | 52
35. McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 50
36. Raso, Hayley | POR | 49
37. Vasconcelos, Michele | CHI | 43
Spencer, Jasmyne | SEA | 43
39. Prince, Nichelle | HOU | 41
Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 41
Addo, Elizabeth | SEA | 41
42. Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 38
43. Tiernan, Madison | NJ | 37
Mewis, Samantha | NC | 37
45. Hill, Rachel | ORL | 36
46. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 35
47. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 34
48. Dorsey, Imani | NJ | 33
Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 33
Smith, Taylor | WAS | 33

 

Chances Created

1. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 48
2. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 47
3. Debinha | NC | 44
4. Hinkle, Jaelene | NC | 43
McDonald, Jessica | NC | 43
Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 43
7. Daly, Rachel | HOU | 42
8. Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 41
9. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 40
Kerr, Sam | CHI | 40
11. McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 37
12. Marta | ORL | 36
Sinclair, Christine | POR | 36
14. Mathias, Merritt | NC | 32
15. Dahlkemper, Abby | NC | 31
16. Williams, Lynn | NC | 29
Klingenberg, Meghan | POR | 29
18. Ubogagu, Chioma | ORL | 28
Heath, Tobin | POR | 28
20. Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 26
Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 26
Nairn, Christine | ORL | 26
Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 26
24. Morgan, Alex | ORL | 25
Horan, Lindsey | POR | 25
Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 25
Zerboni, McCall | NC | 25
28. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 24
Mewis, Samantha | NC | 24
30. Crnogorčević, Ana-Maria | POR | 23
Nielsen, Theresa | SEA | 23
32. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 22
DiBernardo, Vanessa | CHI | 22
Gorry, Katrina | UTA | 22
35. Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 21
Groom, Shea | NJ | 21
Stengel, Katie | UTA | 21
Catley, Steph | SEA | 21
Smith, Taylor | WAS | 21
40. Ohai, Kealia | HOU | 20
Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 20
Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 20
Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 20
44. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 19
Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 19
Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 19
Pugh, Mallory | WAS | 19
48. Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 18
Johnson, Katie | NJ | 18
Bowen, Katie | UTA | 18

 

Successful Crosses/Corners

1. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 43
Hinkle, Jaelene | NC | 43
3. Dahlkemper, Abby | NC | 40
4. Klingenberg, Meghan | POR | 31
5. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 28
6. Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 27
7. Heath, Tobin | POR | 26
8. Marta | ORL | 24
9. Mathias, Merritt | NC | 23
10. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 21
11. Debinha | NC | 19
12. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 18
Nairn, Christine | ORL | 18
14. Nielsen, Theresa | SEA | 17
Smith, Taylor | WAS | 17
16. Catley, Steph | SEA | 16
17. Bowen, Katie | UTA | 14
McDonald, Jessica | NC | 14
Church, Whitney | WAS | 14
20. McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 13
21. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 12
Kerr, Sam | CHI | 12
23. DiBernardo, Vanessa | CHI | 11
Daly, Rachel | HOU | 11
Gorry, Katrina | UTA | 11
Kawasumi, Nahomi | SEA | 11
27. Williams, Lynn | NC | 10
Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 10
Pugh, Mallory | WAS | 10
30. Prince, Nichelle | HOU | 9
Purce, Midge | POR | 9
Horan, Lindsey | POR | 9
Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 9
Dunn, Crystal | NC | 9
Mewis, Kristie | HOU | 9
Pickett, Carson | ORL | 9
37. Ohai, Kealia | HOU | 8
Hill, Rachel | ORL | 8
Carpenter, Ellie | POR | 8
Ubogagu, Chioma | ORL | 8
41. Chapman, Allysha | HOU | 7
Krieger, Ali | ORL | 7
Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 7
44. Elby, Brooke | CHI | 6
Huster, Tori | WAS | 6
Frisbie, Amanda | NJ | 6
O’Reilly, Heather | NC | 6
Banini, Estefanía | WAS | 6
49. Miramontez, Sidney | UTA | 5
O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 5
Press, Christen | UTA | 5
Reynolds, Katherine | POR | 5
Matheson, Diana | UTA | 5
Lytle, Taylor | UTA | 5
van Egmond, Emily | ORL | 5
Raso, Hayley | POR | 5

 

Passing Accuracy (min. 400 pass attempts)

1. Sauerbrunn, Becky | UTA | 86.23% | 1046 pass attempts
2. Long, Allie | SEA | 84.32 | 1059
3. Andressinha | POR | 84.19 | 468
4. Menges, Emily | POR | 83.85 | 650
5. Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 83.33 | 1314
6. Mônica | ORL | 82.87 | 683
7. Scott, Desiree | UTA | 82.31 | 899
8. Erceg, Abby | NC | 81.95 | 1047
9. Skroski, Erica | NJ | 81.87 | 739
10. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 81.23 | 1140
11. Marta | ORL | 80.66 | 512
12. Rodríguez, Raquel | NJ | 80.56 | 432
13. Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 79.86 | 710
14. Johnson, Samantha | UTA | 79.38 | 485
15. Dahlkemper, Abby | NC | 79.32 | 885
16. Johnson, Estelle | WAS | 79.05 | 840
17. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 78.95 | 988
18. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 78.48 | 725
19. LaBonta, Lo’eau | UTA | 77.82 | 505
20. van Wyk, Janine | HOU | 77.78 | 630
21. Sonnett, Emily | POR | 77.77 | 886
22. Richardson, Dominique | NJ | 77.73 | 503
23. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 77.68 | 1017
24. McNabb, Kristen | SEA | 77.02 | 583
25. Dougherty Howard, Meggie | WAS | 76.7 | 704
26. Brooks, Amber | HOU | 76.67 | 853
27. Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 76.4 | 716
Heath, Tobin | POR | 76.4 | 534
29. Freeman, Mandy | NJ | 76.22 | 698
30. Krieger, Ali | ORL | 76.05 | 856
31. Banini, Estefanía | WAS | 75.95 | 449
32. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 75.88 | 995
33. Naughton, Katie | CHI | 75.81 | 926
34. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 75.71 | 992
35. Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 75.62 | 968
36. Gibbons, Christina | NJ | 75.53 | 613
37. Quinn, Rebecca | WAS | 75.39 | 776
38. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 75.17 | 1293
39. Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 74.96 | 591
40. Frisbie, Amanda | NJ | 74.39 | 449
41. Catley, Steph | SEA | 74.32 | 588
42. Hanson, Haley | HOU | 74.31 | 576
43. Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 74.23 | 718
44. Nairn, Christine | ORL | 74.17 | 631
45. Barnes, Lauren | SEA | 74.12 | 1055
46. Boureille, Celeste | POR | 74.01 | 754
47. Church, Whitney | WAS | 73.83 | 833
48. Klingenberg, Meghan | POR | 73.71 | 833
49. Matheson, Diana | UTA | 73.7 | 578
50. Gorden, Sarah | CHI | 73.37 | 552

 

Total Passes

1. Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 1314
2. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 1293
3. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 1140
4. Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 1092
5. Long, Allie | SEA | 1059
6. Barnes, Lauren | SEA | 1055
7. Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 1048
8. Erceg, Abby | NC | 1047
9. Sauerbrunn, Becky | UTA | 1046
10. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 1017
11. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 995
12. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 992
13. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 988
14. Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 968
15. Moros, Becca | UTA | 940
16. Naughton, Katie | CHI | 926
17. Sinclair, Christine | POR | 903
18. Scott, Desiree | UTA | 899
19. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 898
20. Sonnett, Emily | POR | 886
21. Dahlkemper, Abby | NC | 884
22. Krieger, Ali | ORL | 856
23. Brooks, Amber | HOU | 853
24. Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 842
25. Johnson, Estelle | WAS | 840
26. Naeher, Alyssa | CHI | 839
27. Klingenberg, Meghan | POR | 833
Church, Whitney | WAS | 833
29. Campbell, Jane | HOU | 829
30. Hinkle, Jaelene | NC | 817
31. Sheridan, Kailen | NJ | 784
32. Daly, Rachel | HOU | 781
33. Quinn, Rebecca | WAS | 776
34. Smith, Taylor | WAS | 768
35. Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 766
36. Boureille, Celeste | POR | 754
37. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 743
38. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 740
39. Skroski, Erica | NJ | 739
40. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 723
41. Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 718
42. Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 716
43. Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 711
44. Dougherty Howard, Meggie | WAS | 704
45. Freeman, Mandy | NJ | 698
46. Mathias, Merritt | NC | 689
47. Mônica | ORL | 683
48. Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 680
49. Bowen, Katie | UTA | 678
50. Johnson, Samantha | UTA | 674

 

Passing Accuracy in Opp Half (min. 50 pass attempts)

1. Andressinha | POR | 79.52% | 293 pass attempts
2. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 77.76 | 589
3. Brian, Morgan | CHI | 77.14 | 175
4. Marta | ORL | 77.03 | 370
5. Foord, Caitlin | POR | 76.56 | 64
6. Rodríguez, Raquel | NJ | 76.35 | 241
7. Scott, Desiree | UTA | 75.72 | 416
8. Mônica | ORL | 74.12 | 228
9. Lytle, Taylor | UTA | 74 | 150
Hoy, Jennifer | NJ | 74 | 50
11. Banini, Estefanía | WAS | 73.79 | 290
12. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 73.61 | 610
13. Long, Allie | SEA | 73.59 | 390
14. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 73.22 | 478
15. Pugh, Mallory | WAS | 72.87 | 258
16. Dougherty Howard, Meggie | WAS | 72.59 | 394
17. Rodriguez, Amy | UTA | 72.53 | 233
18. Heath, Tobin | POR | 71.54 | 376
19. Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 71.27 | 536
20. Solaun, Havana | WAS | 71.21 | 132
21. Kawasumi, Nahomi | SEA | 71.09 | 211
22. Dahlkemper, Abby | NC | 70.71 | 379
23. O’Reilly, Heather | NC | 70.59 | 68
24. Skroski, Erica | NJ | 70.47 | 254
25. Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 70.44 | 433
26. Lavelle, Rose | WAS | 70.43 | 115
27. Stengel, Katie | UTA | 70.41 | 338
28. Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 70.17 | 362
29. Camila | ORL | 70 | 80
30. Gibbons, Christina | NJ | 69.96 | 273
31. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 69.88 | 518
32. Sauerbrunn, Becky | UTA | 69.87 | 302
33. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 69.74 | 575
34. DiBernardo, Vanessa | CHI | 69.59 | 194
35. Hanson, Haley | HOU | 69.38 | 258
36. Erceg, Abby | NC | 69.25 | 374
37. Shim, Meleana | HOU | 69.23 | 104
38. Thaisa | NJ | 69.01 | 71
39. Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 68.71 | 294
40. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 68.02 | 444
41. Tymrak, Erika | UTA | 67.72 | 158
42. Stott, Rebekah | NJ | 67.35 | 98
43. Kgatlana, Thembi | HOU | 67.16 | 67
44. Lohman, Joanna | WAS | 67.03 | 91
45. Krieger, Ali | ORL | 66.67 | 372
Menges, Emily | POR | 66.67 | 159
47. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 66.6 | 491
48. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 66.58 | 739
49. Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 66.38 | 351
50. Matheson, Diana | UTA | 66.11 | 357

 

Passing Accuracy Own Half (min. 50 pass attempts)

1. Sauerbrunn, Becky | UTA | 92.88% | 744 pass attempts
2. Andressinha | POR | 92 | 175
3. Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 90.85 | 918
4. LaBonta, Lo’eau | UTA | 90.83 | 240
5. Long, Allie | SEA | 90.58 | 669
6. Marta | ORL | 90.14 | 142
7. Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 89.94 | 348
8. Sonnett, Emily | POR | 89.85 | 611
9. Menges, Emily | POR | 89.41 | 491
10. Erceg, Abby | NC | 89 | 673
11. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 88.94 | 470
12. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 88.66 | 247
13. Nairn, Christine | ORL | 88.31 | 248
14. Pugh, Mallory | WAS | 88.28 | 128
15. O’Reilly, Heather | NC | 88.24 | 51
16. Scott, Desiree | UTA | 87.99 | 483
17. Heath, Tobin | POR | 87.97 | 158
18. Skroski, Erica | NJ | 87.84 | 485
19. Johnson, Samantha | UTA | 87.38 | 428
20. Mônica | ORL | 87.25 | 455
21. Stott, Rebekah | NJ | 87.1 | 248
22. van Wyk, Janine | HOU | 86.93 | 459
23. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 86.64 | 554
24. Richardson, Dominique | NJ | 86.57 | 335
Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 86.57 | 283
26. Church, Whitney | WAS | 86.48 | 488
27. Brooks, Amber | HOU | 86.22 | 566
McNabb, Kristen | SEA | 86.22 | 421
29. Matheson, Diana | UTA | 85.97 | 221
30. DiBernardo, Vanessa | CHI | 85.95 | 121
31. Rodríguez, Raquel | NJ | 85.86 | 191
32. Johnson, Estelle | WAS | 85.81 | 592
33. Dahlkemper, Abby | NC | 85.77 | 506
34. Eubanks, Mallory | WAS | 85.56 | 90
35. Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 85.51 | 283
36. Utsugi, Rumi | SEA | 85.34 | 348
37. Williams, Lynn | NC | 85.29 | 68
38. Bowen, Katie | UTA | 85.22 | 318
39. Freeman, Mandy | NJ | 85.21 | 453
40. Johnson, Katie | NJ | 85.06 | 87
41. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 84.94 | 551
42. Catley, Steph | SEA | 84.83 | 290
43. Dorsey, Imani | NJ | 84.77 | 151
44. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 84.73 | 668
45. Quinn, Rebecca | WAS | 84.63 | 449
46. Naughton, Katie | CHI | 84.6 | 617
47. Thaisa | NJ | 84.34 | 83
48. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 84.29 | 420
49. Shim, Meleana | HOU | 84.14 | 145
50. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 83.78 | 407

 

Passing Accuracy, ending in final third (min 10 attempts)

1. Foord, Caitlin | POR | 78% | 50 pass attempts
2. Rodríguez, Raquel | NJ | 77.42 | 124
3. Brian, Morgan | CHI | 74.49 | 98
4. Lytle, Taylor | UTA | 73.12 | 93
5. Marta | ORL | 72.8 | 250
6. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 71.48 | 270
7. Camila | ORL | 71.43 | 49
8. Andressinha | POR | 71.15 | 156
9. Roccaro, Cari | NC | 70.59 | 17
10. Banini, Estefanía | WAS | 69.77 | 172
11. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 69.57 | 322
12. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 69.09 | 275
13. Heath, Tobin | POR | 69.01 | 242
Solaun, Havana | WAS | 69.01 | 71
15. Dougherty Howard, Meggie | WAS | 68.42 | 190
16. Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 67.41 | 316
17. Pugh, Mallory | WAS | 67.26 | 168
18. Rodriguez, Amy | UTA | 67.11 | 152
19. Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 66.84 | 187
20. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 66.67 | 300
Scott, Desiree | UTA | 66.67 | 171
22. Stengel, Katie | UTA | 66.5 | 206
23. Skroski, Erica | NJ | 66.39 | 119
24. Long, Allie | SEA | 66.06 | 165
25. Lohman, Joanna | WAS | 65.96 | 47
26. Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 65.45 | 246
27. O’Reilly, Heather | NC | 64.52 | 31
28. Leon, Adriana | SEA | 64.29 | 14
29. Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 64.09 | 220
30. Lavelle, Rose | WAS | 64.06 | 64
31. Kawasumi, Nahomi | SEA | 63.64 | 132
32. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 63.42 | 421
33. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 63.33 | 330
Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 63.33 | 120
35. Matheson, Diana | UTA | 62.95 | 251
36. Jenkins, Darian | NC | 62.86 | 35
37. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 62.59 | 278
38. McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 62.32 | 276
39. Meehan, McKenzie | NJ | 62.3 | 61
40. Tymrak, Erika | UTA | 61.86 | 97
41. Debinha | NC | 61.84 | 304
42. Gibbons, Christina | NJ | 61.76 | 136
43. Sinclair, Christine | POR | 61.59 | 427
44. Dorsey, Imani | NJ | 61.39 | 101
45. Addo, Elizabeth | SEA | 61.34 | 119
46. Thaisa | NJ | 61.29 | 31
Hoy, Jennifer | NJ | 61.29 | 31
48. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 61.11 | 288
49. Catley, Steph | SEA | 61.08 | 167
50. Hanson, Haley | HOU | 61.02 | 118

 

Dribbles Completed

1. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 46
2. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 44
Hinkle, Jaelene | NC | 44
4. Debinha | NC | 43
5. Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 36
6. Marta | ORL | 34
7. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 33
Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 33
9. Ohai, Kealia | HOU | 32
Ubogagu, Chioma | ORL | 32
11. Williams, Lynn | NC | 30
Pugh, Mallory | WAS | 30
13. Press, Christen | UTA | 28
14. Purce, Midge | POR | 27
Addo, Elizabeth | SEA | 27
16. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 26
Kerr, Sam | CHI | 26
Smith, Taylor | WAS | 26
19. Prince, Nichelle | HOU | 25
Heath, Tobin | POR | 25
21. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 24
Banini, Estefanía | WAS | 24
23. Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 23
24. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 22
25. Scott, Desiree | UTA | 21
Daly, Rachel | HOU | 21
Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 21
Moros, Becca | UTA | 21
Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 21
Mathias, Merritt | NC | 21
31. Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 19
32. McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 18
Simon, Kyah | HOU | 18
Groom, Shea | NJ | 18
Frisbie, Amanda | NJ | 18
Ordega, Francisca | WAS | 18
37. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 17
Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 17
Mewis, Kristie | HOU | 17
Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 17
Mewis, Samantha | NC | 17
Beckie, Janine | NJ | 17
43. Hill, Rachel | ORL | 15
McDonald, Jessica | NC | 15
45. Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 14
Gorry, Katrina | UTA | 14
Tymrak, Erika | UTA | 14
Sinclair, Christine | POR | 14
49. Johnson, Katie | NJ | 13
Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 13
Catley, Steph | SEA | 13
Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 13

 

Dribbles Attempted

1. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 98
2. Debinha | NC | 97
3. Hinkle, Jaelene | NC | 82
4. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 81
5. Ubogagu, Chioma | ORL | 73
6. Pugh, Mallory | WAS | 66
7. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 65
Williams, Lynn | NC | 65
9. Ohai, Kealia | HOU | 63
Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 63
Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 63
12. Marta | ORL | 62
Smith, Taylor | WAS | 62
14. McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 58
Purce, Midge | POR | 58
16. Heath, Tobin | POR | 57
17. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 56
18. Prince, Nichelle | HOU | 54
19. Daly, Rachel | HOU | 53
20. Addo, Elizabeth | SEA | 51
21. Press, Christen | UTA | 49
Kerr, Sam | CHI | 49
23. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 47
Ordega, Francisca | WAS | 47
25. Mathias, Merritt | NC | 45
26. Spencer, Jasmyne | SEA | 44
27. Banini, Estefanía | WAS | 43
28. Beckie, Janine | NJ | 42
29. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 40
30. Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 39
Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 39
Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 39
33. Latsko, Veronica | HOU | 38
Groom, Shea | NJ | 38
35. Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 36
McDonald, Jessica | NC | 36
Frisbie, Amanda | NJ | 36
38. Scott, Desiree | UTA | 34
Hill, Rachel | ORL | 34
Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 34
Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 34
42. Tymrak, Erika | UTA | 33
43. Carpenter, Ellie | POR | 32
Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 32
Rodriguez, Amy | UTA | 32
Gorry, Katrina | UTA | 32
Moros, Becca | UTA | 32
48. Dorsey, Imani | NJ | 31
49. Johnson, Katie | NJ | 30
Simon, Kyah | HOU | 30

 

Total Duels Won

1. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 297
2. Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 205
3. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 203
4. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 169
5. Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 158
6. Long, Allie | SEA | 157
7. Sinclair, Christine | POR | 151
8. Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 147
9. Daly, Rachel | HOU | 134
10. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 132
Moros, Becca | UTA | 132
12. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 129
Kerr, Sam | CHI | 129
14. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 128
15. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 127
16. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 124
17. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 119
Brooks, Amber | HOU | 119
19. Erceg, Abby | NC | 116
Williams, Lynn | NC | 116
21. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 115
Smith, Taylor | WAS | 115
23. Groom, Shea | NJ | 114
Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 114
25. Yanez, Beverly | SEA | 112
Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 112
Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 112
28. Debinha | NC | 111
Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 111
Naughton, Katie | CHI | 111
31. Tiernan, Madison | NJ | 110
Mewis, Samantha | NC | 110
33. Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 108
34. Hinkle, Jaelene | NC | 107
35. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 106
36. Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 105
37. Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 102
Dougherty Howard, Meggie | WAS | 102
39. Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 101
McDonald, Jessica | NC | 101
41. Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 99
42. Purce, Midge | POR | 98
43. Hanson, Haley | HOU | 97
Mathias, Merritt | NC | 97
45. Mewis, Kristie | HOU | 96
46. Morgan, Alex | ORL | 94
47. Boureille, Celeste | POR | 91
48. Nielsen, Theresa | SEA | 90
49. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 89
Utsugi, Rumi | SEA | 89

 

Total Duels

1. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 503
2. Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 365
3. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 361
4. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 349
5. Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 323
6. Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 302
7. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 298
8. Daly, Rachel | HOU | 287
9. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 274
Killion, Sarah | NJ | 274
11. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 271
12. Sinclair, Christine | POR | 269
13. Long, Allie | SEA | 266
14. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 259
15. Debinha | NC | 258
16. Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 239
17. Tiernan, Madison | NJ | 238
18. Williams, Lynn | NC | 236
19. Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 233
20. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 232
21. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 230
22. Yanez, Beverly | SEA | 227
23. Kerr, Sam | CHI | 224
Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 224
25. Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 221
26. McDonald, Jessica | NC | 218
27. Ordega, Francisca | WAS | 217
28. Groom, Shea | NJ | 216
29. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 214
30. Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 212
31. Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 211
32. Dougherty Howard, Meggie | WAS | 206
McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 204
34. Stengel, Katie | UTA | 201
35. Hinkle, Jaelene | NC | 200
36. Morgan, Alex | ORL | 199
Smith, Taylor | WAS | 199
38. Moros, Becca | UTA | 198
39. Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 197
40. Heath, Tobin | POR | 194
Hanson, Haley | HOU | 194
42. Brooks, Amber | HOU | 193
43. Marta | ORL | 192
44. Mathias, Merritt | NC | 189
45. Mewis, Samantha | NC | 187
46. Purce, Midge | POR | 185
Naughton, Katie | CHI | 185
48. Addo, Elizabeth | SEA | 184
Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 184
50. Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 183

 

Aerial Duels Won

1. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 141
2. Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 98
3. Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 93
4. Sinclair, Christine | POR | 91
5. Erceg, Abby | NC | 81
6. Long, Allie | SEA | 78
7. Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 77
8. McDonald, Jessica | NC | 71
9. Kerr, Sam | CHI | 70
10. Mewis, Samantha | NC | 69
11. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 66
12. Morgan, Alex | ORL | 56
13. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 55
Daly, Rachel | HOU | 55
15. Williams, Lynn | NC | 54
16. Naughton, Katie | CHI | 53
17. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 47
Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 47
19. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 43
20. Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 42
Groom, Shea | NJ | 42
22. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 41
Yanez, Beverly | SEA | 41
van Egmond, Emily | ORL | 41
25. Brooks, Amber | HOU | 40
26. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 39
Andrews, Morgan | SEA | 39
Krieger, Ali | ORL | 39
29. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 38
30. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 37
31. Sauerbrunn, Becky | UTA | 36
Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 36
Huster, Tori | WAS | 36
34. Ertz, Julie | CHI | 33
Stengel, Katie | UTA | 33
Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 33
Boureille, Celeste | POR | 33
38. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 32
Hanson, Haley | HOU | 32
40. Johnson, Katie | NJ | 31
Crnogorčević, Ana-Maria | POR | 31
Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 31
43. Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 28
Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 28
45. Tiernan, Madison | NJ | 27
Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 27
47. Barnes, Lauren | SEA | 26
48. McNabb, Kristen | SEA | 25
Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 25
50. McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 24
Moros, Becca | UTA | 24
Pressley, Toni | ORL | 24
Church, Whitney | WAS | 24

 

Aerial Duels

1. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 202
2. Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 182
3. Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 178
4. Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 154
5. Sinclair, Christine | POR | 143
6. McDonald, Jessica | NC | 133
7. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 132
8. Erceg, Abby | NC | 122
9. Long, Allie | SEA | 117
10. Daly, Rachel | HOU | 112
11. Kerr, Sam | CHI | 108
12. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 106
13. Mewis, Samantha | NC | 104
14. Morgan, Alex | ORL | 99
Williams, Lynn | NC | 99
16. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 98
17. Yanez, Beverly | SEA | 90
18. Stengel, Katie | UTA | 88
19. Naughton, Katie | CHI | 87
Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 87
21. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 84
22. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 82
Zerboni, McCall | NC | 82
24. Huster, Tori | WAS | 81
25. Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 79
26. Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 76
27. Crnogorčević, Ana-Maria | POR | 75
28. van Egmond, Emily | ORL | 73
29. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 71
30. Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 70
Brooks, Amber | HOU | 70
32. Tiernan, Madison | NJ | 69
33. Groom, Shea | NJ | 68
34. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 67
35. Krieger, Ali | ORL | 65
36. Sauerbrunn, Becky | UTA | 64
Andrews, Morgan | SEA | 64
Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 64
Dougherty Howard, Meggie | WAS | 64
40. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 63
41. Hanson, Haley | HOU | 62
Boureille, Celeste | POR | 62
43. Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 59
44. Johnson, Katie | NJ | 58
Church, Whitney | WAS | 58
46. Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 57
Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 56
48. McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 55
Ertz, Julie | CHI | 55
50. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 54
Catley, Steph | SEA | 54

 

Recoveries

1. Bledsoe, Aubrey | WAS | 288
2. Campbell, Jane | HOU | 275
3. Naeher, Alyssa | CHI | 261
Sheridan, Kailen | NJ | 261
5. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 218
6. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 215
7. Harris, Ashlyn | ORL | 210
Zerboni, McCall | NC | 210
9. Smith, Abby | UTA | 199
10. Rowland, Katelyn | NC | 197
11. Long, Allie | SEA | 196
12. Hinkle, Jaelene | NC | 191
13. Erceg, Abby | NC | 182
14. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 179
15. Williams, Lydia | SEA | 174
16. Brooks, Amber | HOU | 173
17. Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 167
18. Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 166
19. Scott, Desiree | UTA | 163
20. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 161
21. Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 157
22. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 156
23. Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 155
24. Sonnett, Emily | POR | 154
25. Naughton, Katie | CHI | 151
26. Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 150
27. Smith, Taylor | WAS | 149
28. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 145
Dunn, Crystal | NC | 145
30. Franch, Adrianna | POR | 144
31. Skroski, Erica | NJ | 143
32. Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 140
33. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 138
Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 138
Krieger, Ali | ORL | 138
36. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 135
Johnson, Estelle | WAS | 135
Sinclair, Christine | POR | 135
39. Dahlkemper, Abby | NC | 134
40. Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 133
Boureille, Celeste | POR | 133
42. Moros, Becca | UTA | 130
43. van Wyk, Janine | HOU | 129
44. Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 127
45. Klingenberg, Meghan | POR | 126
46. Debinha | NC | 123
47. Dougherty Howard, Meggie | WAS | 122
48. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 119
49. Gorden, Sarah | CHI | 118
50. Mewis, Samantha | NC | 116

 

Tackles Won

1. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 63
2. Moros, Becca | UTA | 57
3. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 48
4. Tiernan, Madison | NJ | 47
Horan, Lindsey | POR | 47
Nielsen, Theresa | SEA | 47
7. Brooks, Amber | HOU | 45
8. Smith, Taylor | WAS | 43
9. Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 42
10. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 41
11. Scott, Desiree | UTA | 40
Utsugi, Rumi | SEA | 40
13. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 39
Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 39
Ordega, Francisca | WAS | 39
16. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 38
17. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 35
Hinkle, Jaelene | NC | 35
19. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 34
20. Yanez, Beverly | SEA | 33
Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 33
Hanson, Haley | HOU | 33
23. Debinha | NC | 32
Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 32
Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 32
26. Gibbons, Christina | NJ | 31
Mathias, Merritt | NC | 31
28. Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 30
29. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 29
Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 29
31. Purce, Midge | POR | 28
Sinclair, Christine | POR | 28
33. Freeman, Mandy | NJ | 27
Boureille, Celeste | POR | 27
35. Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 26
Mewis, Kristie | HOU | 26
Klingenberg, Meghan | POR | 26
van Wyk, Janine | HOU | 26
39. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 25
Chapman, Allysha | HOU | 25
Naughton, Katie | CHI | 25
Long, Allie | SEA | 25
Dougherty Howard, Meggie | WAS | 25
44. Elby, Brooke | CHI | 24
Gorry, Katrina | UTA | 24
46. Huster, Tori | WAS | 23
47. Carpenter, Ellie | POR | 22
Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 22
Williams, Lynn | NC | 22
Catley, Steph | SEA | 22

 

Tackles

1. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 92
2. Moros, Becca | UTA | 74
3. Nielsen, Theresa | SEA | 72
4. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 71
5. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 68
6. Tiernan, Madison | NJ | 62
7. Brooks, Amber | HOU | 60
8. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 58
9. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 57
Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 57
11. Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 55
12. Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 54
13. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 53
Smith, Taylor | WAS | 53
15. Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 52
Utsugi, Rumi | SEA | 52
17. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 50
Hanson, Haley | HOU | 50
19. Scott, Desiree | UTA | 49
20. Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 48
21. Purce, Midge | POR | 47
Ordega, Francisca | WAS | 47
23. Yanez, Beverly | SEA | 46
Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 46
25. van Wyk, Janine | HOU | 45
26. Mewis, Kristie | HOU | 44
27. Debinha | NC | 43
28. Naughton, Katie | CHI | 42
Klingenberg, Meghan | POR | 42
30. Hinkle, Jaelene | NC | 41
Long, Allie | SEA | 41
Dougherty Howard, Meggie | WAS | 41
Gibbons, Christina | NJ | 41
Mathias, Merritt | NC | 41
35. Boureille, Celeste | POR | 40
36. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 39
37. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 38
38. Gorry, Katrina | UTA | 37
Freeman, Mandy | NJ | 37
40. Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 36
41. Elby, Brooke | CHI | 35
Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 35
Catley, Steph | SEA | 35
Sinclair, Christine | POR | 35
45. Chapman, Allysha | HOU | 34
46. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 33
47. Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 32
Hubly, Kelli | POR | 32
49. Sonnett, Emily | POR | 30
Sauerbrunn, Becky | UTA | 30
Daly, Rachel | HOU | 30

 

Blocks

1. Johnson, Estelle | WAS | 32
2. van Wyk, Janine | HOU | 26
3. Brooks, Amber | HOU | 23
4. Erceg, Abby | NC | 20
5. Sauerbrunn, Becky | UTA | 18
6. Mônica | ORL | 17
7. Krieger, Ali | ORL | 16
Barnes, Lauren | SEA | 16
Church, Whitney | WAS | 16
10. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 15
11. Naughton, Katie | CHI | 14
Freeman, Mandy | NJ | 14
13. Sonnett, Emily | POR | 13
14. Skroski, Erica | NJ | 12
Gibbons, Christina | NJ | 12
16. McNabb, Kristen | SEA | 11
Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 11
Long, Allie | SEA | 11
Dahlkemper, Abby | NC | 11
Richardson, Dominique | NJ | 11
21. Johnson, Samantha | UTA | 10
Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 10
Reynolds, Katherine | POR | 10
24. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 9
25. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 8
Quinn, Rebecca | WAS | 8
Ertz, Julie | CHI | 8
Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 8
Frisbie, Amanda | NJ | 8
Pickett, Carson | ORL | 8
Boureille, Celeste | POR | 8
32. Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 7
Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 7
Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 7
Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 7
Polkinghorne, Clare | HOU | 7
Menges, Emily | POR | 7
Sinclair, Christine | POR | 7
39. Agnew, Lindsay | HOU | 6
Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 6
Hubly, Kelli | POR | 6
42. Short, Casey | CHI | 5
Tiernan, Madison | NJ | 5
Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 5
Huster, Tori | WAS | 5
Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 5
Stott, Rebekah | NJ | 5
Hanson, Haley | HOU | 5
Utsugi, Rumi | SEA | 5
50. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 4
Elby, Brooke | CHI | 4
Bowen, Katie | UTA | 4
Gorden, Sarah | CHI | 4
Mewis, Samantha | NC | 4

 

Clearances (inc. punches)

1. Johnson, Estelle | WAS | 122
2. Erceg, Abby | NC | 110
3. Sonnett, Emily | POR | 104
4. Brooks, Amber | HOU | 103
Church, Whitney | WAS | 103
6. Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 100
7. Naughton, Katie | CHI | 99
8. van Wyk, Janine | HOU | 98
9. Barnes, Lauren | SEA | 95
10. Sauerbrunn, Becky | UTA | 89
11. Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 83
12. Menges, Emily | POR | 82
13. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 80
Reynolds, Katherine | POR | 80
15. Richardson, Dominique | NJ | 72
16. Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 65
Freeman, Mandy | NJ | 65
18. Johnson, Samantha | UTA | 63
Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 63
20. Smith, Taylor | WAS | 61
21. Dahlkemper, Abby | NC | 60
Krieger, Ali | ORL | 60
23. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 57
Chapman, Allysha | HOU | 57
Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 57
Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 57
27. Skroski, Erica | NJ | 56
28. Klingenberg, Meghan | POR | 55
29. Ertz, Julie | CHI | 54
30. McNabb, Kristen | SEA | 51
31. Hubly, Kelli | POR | 50
32. Quinn, Rebecca | WAS | 47
Frisbie, Amanda | NJ | 47
34. Long, Allie | SEA | 46
35. Moros, Becca | UTA | 42
36. Nielsen, Theresa | SEA | 41
37. Mônica | ORL | 40
38. Stott, Rebekah | NJ | 39
39. Huster, Tori | WAS | 37
Daly, Rachel | HOU | 37
41. Boureille, Celeste | POR | 36
42. Naeher, Alyssa | CHI | 35
Gorden, Sarah | CHI | 35
44. Catley, Steph | SEA | 34
Gibbons, Christina | NJ | 34
46. Mathias, Merritt | NC | 33
47. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 32
48. Keever, Kimberly | HOU | 31
Purce, Midge | POR | 31
50. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 31
Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 31
Pickett, Carson | ORL | 31

 

Headed Clearances

1. Erceg, Abby | NC | 62
2. Brooks, Amber | HOU | 58
3. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 42
van Wyk, Janine | HOU | 42
5. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 41
6. Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 37
7. Sauerbrunn, Becky | UTA | 36
8. Sonnett, Emily | POR | 35
Naughton, Katie | CHI | 35
Johnson, Estelle | WAS | 35
11. Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 34
Barnes, Lauren | SEA | 34
13. Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 33
Menges, Emily | POR | 33
15. Long, Allie | SEA | 32
16. Church, Whitney | WAS | 30
17. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 29
Krieger, Ali | ORL | 29
19. Dahlkemper, Abby | NC | 28
20. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 27
21. Freeman, Mandy | NJ | 26
Richardson, Dominique | NJ | 26
23. Sinclair, Christine | POR | 24
24. Johnson, Samantha | UTA | 23
Reynolds, Katherine | POR | 23
26. Moros, Becca | UTA | 22
Smith, Taylor | WAS | 22
28. Ertz, Julie | CHI | 21
29. Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 20
30. Chapman, Allysha | HOU | 19
31. Daly, Rachel | HOU | 18
Hanson, Haley | HOU | 18
33. McNabb, Kristen | SEA | 17
Huster, Tori | WAS | 17
Skroski, Erica | NJ | 17
Klingenberg, Meghan | POR | 17
Hubly, Kelli | POR | 17
38. Quinn, Rebecca | WAS | 16
Frisbie, Amanda | NJ | 16
Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 16
Pickett, Carson | ORL | 16
42. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 14
McDonald, Jessica | NC | 14
Mônica | ORL | 14
Kurtz, Kaleigh | NC | 14
Kerr, Sam | CHI | 14
47. Bowen, Katie | UTA | 13
Stott, Rebekah | NJ | 13
Boureille, Celeste | POR | 13
50. Gorden, Sarah | CHI | 12
Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 12
Mewis, Kristie | HOU | 12
Mathias, Merritt | NC | 12

 

Interceptions

1. Brooks, Amber | HOU | 85
2. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 70
3. Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 61
4. Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 60
5. Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 57
6. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 56
Johnson, Estelle | WAS | 56
8. van Wyk, Janine | HOU | 54
9. Killion, Sarah | NJ | 53
Nielsen, Theresa | SEA | 53
11. Church, Whitney | WAS | 52
12. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 51
13. Scott, Desiree | UTA | 50
Erceg, Abby | NC | 50
15. Bowen, Katie | UTA | 49
Boureille, Celeste | POR | 49
17. Sauerbrunn, Becky | UTA | 48
18. Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 47
Moros, Becca | UTA | 47
20. Krieger, Ali | ORL | 46
Pickett, Carson | ORL | 46
22. Naughton, Katie | CHI | 45
Barnes, Lauren | SEA | 45
24. Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 43
25. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 42
Hinkle, Jaelene | NC | 42
27. Elby, Brooke | CHI | 41
28. Freeman, Mandy | NJ | 40
Reynolds, Katherine | POR | 40
30. Long, Allie | SEA | 38
31. Skroski, Erica | NJ | 37
Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 37
Poliana | ORL | 37
34. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 36
Mathias, Merritt | NC | 36
36. Sonnett, Emily | POR | 35
Richardson, Dominique | NJ | 35
38. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 34
Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 34
40. Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 33
Hanson, Haley | HOU | 33
Smith, Taylor | WAS | 33
43. Chapman, Allysha | HOU | 31
Mônica | ORL | 31
45. Johnson, Samantha | UTA | 30
Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 30
Quinn, Rebecca | WAS | 30
48. Gorden, Sarah | CHI | 29
Gibbons, Christina | NJ | 29
50. Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 28

 

Saves

1. Bledsoe, Aubrey | WAS | 108
2. Sheridan, Kailen | NJ | 108
3. Campbell, Jane | HOU | 89
4. Harris, Ashlyn | ORL | 70
5. Naeher, Alyssa | CHI | 64
6. Williams, Lydia | SEA | 56
7. Franch, Adrianna | POR | 45
8. Rowland, Katelyn | NC | 43
9. Betos, Michelle | SEA | 40
10. Eckerstrom, Britt | POR | 37
11. Smith, Abby | UTA | 31
12. Barnhart, Nicole | UTA | 19
13. Kopmeyer, Haley | ORL | 14
14. DiDi Haracic | WAS | 14
15. D’Angelo, Sabrina | NC | 7
16. Boyd, Emily | CHI | 5
17. Wys, Kelsey | WAS | 2
18. Casey, Caroline | NJ | 1

 

Save Percentage and shots faced (including blocked shots)

1. Boyd, Emily | CHI | 100% | 15 shots faced
2. Kopmeyer, Haley | ORL | 87.5% | 51
3. Williams, Lydia | SEA | 83.33% | 222
Betos, Michelle | SEA | 83.33% | 139
5. DiDi Haracic | WAS | 82.35% | 43
6. Barnhart, Nicole | UTA | 79.17% | 80
7. Bledsoe, Aubrey | WAS | 78.26% | 347
8. Franch, Adrianna | POR | 76.27% | 196
9. Rowland, Katelyn | NC | 75.44% | 178
10. Eckerstrom, Britt | POR | 72.55% | 130
11. Naeher, Alyssa | CHI | 69.57% | 290
12. Campbell, Jane | HOU | 69.53% | 370
13. Sheridan, Kailen | NJ | 68.35% | 409
14. D’Angelo, Sabrina | NC | 66.67% | 35
15. Harris, Ashlyn | ORL | 66.35% | 308
16. Smith, Abby | UTA | 63.27% | 161
17. Wys, Kelsey | WAS | 50% | 11
18. Casey, Caroline | NJ | 33.33% | 8

 

Clean Sheets

1. Williams, Lydia | SEA | 10
2. Naeher, Alyssa | CHI | 7
Rowland, Katelyn | NC | 7
4. Smith, Abby | UTA | 6
5. D’Angelo, Sabrina | NC | 4
Harris, Ashlyn | ORL | 4
Bledsoe, Aubrey | WAS | 4
8. Campbell, Jane | HOU | 3
Barnhart, Nicole | UTA | 3
Franch, Adrianna | POR | 3
11. Boyd, Emily | CHI | 2
Sheridan, Kailen | NJ | 2
Eckerstrom, Britt | POR | 2
Betos, Michelle | SEA | 2
15. Kopmeyer, Haley | ORL | 1

 

Saves (from inside the box)

1. Sheridan, Kailen | NJ | 73
2. Bledsoe, Aubrey | WAS | 67
3. Campbell, Jane | HOU | 50
4. Harris, Ashlyn | ORL | 47
5. Naeher, Alyssa | CHI | 42
6. Williams, Lydia | SEA | 41
7. Franch, Adrianna | POR | 27
Betos, Michelle | SEA | 27
9. Eckerstrom, Britt | POR | 24
10. Rowland, Katelyn | NC | 23
11. Smith, Abby | UTA | 21
12. Barnhart, Nicole | UTA | 14
13. DiDi Haracic | WAS | 12
14. Kopmeyer, Haley | ORL | 10
15. D’Angelo, Sabrina | NC | 4
16. Wys, Kelsey | WAS | 1
Boyd, Emily | CHI | 1
Casey, Caroline | NJ | 1

 

Saves (from outside the box)

1. Bledsoe, Aubrey | WAS | 41
2. Campbell, Jane | HOU | 39
3. Sheridan, Kailen | NJ | 35
4. Naeher, Alyssa | CHI | 22
Harris, Ashlyn | ORL | 22
6. Rowland, Katelyn | NC | 20
7. Franch, Adrianna | POR | 18
8. Williams, Lydia | SEA | 14
9. Eckerstrom, Britt | POR | 13
Betos, Michelle | SEA | 13
11. Smith, Abby | UTA | 10
12. Barnhart, Nicole | UTA | 5
13. Boyd, Emily | CHI | 4
Kopmeyer, Haley | ORL | 4
15. DiDi Haracic | WAS | 2
D’Angelo, Sabrina | NC | 2
17. Wys, Kelsey | WAS | 1

 

Penalty Kick Saves

1. Sheridan, Kailen | NJ | 3 saved | 7 faced
2. Campbell, Jane | HOU | 2 | 5
3. Bledsoe, Aubrey | WAS | 2 | 4
4. Eckerstrom, Britt | POR | 1 | 3
5. Rowland, Katelyn | NC | 1 | 2
6. Williams, Lydia | SEA | 1 | 1
7. Smith, Abby | UTA | 0 | 2
8. Naeher, Alyssa | CHI | 0 | 1
Harris, Ashlyn | ORL | 0 | 1
Franch, Adrianna | POR | 0 | 1

 

Catches

1. Rowland, Katelyn | NC | 18
2. Campbell, Jane | HOU | 17
3. Smith, Abby | UTA | 13
Franch, Adrianna | POR | 13
5. Harris, Ashlyn | ORL | 10
6. Betos, Michelle | SEA | 9
Bledsoe, Aubrey | WAS | 9
8. Naeher, Alyssa | CHI | 6
Williams, Lydia | SEA | 6
Sheridan, Kailen | NJ | 6
Barnhart, Nicole | UTA | 6
12. Eckerstrom, Britt | POR | 3
13. D’Angelo, Sabrina | NC | 2
14. DiDi Haracic | WAS | 1

 

Fouls Conceded

1. Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 42
2. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 41
3. Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 40
4. Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 36
5. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 35
6. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 33
Tiernan, Madison | NJ | 33
8. Ordega, Francisca | WAS | 32
9. Long, Allie | SEA | 30
10. O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 28
Killion, Sarah | NJ | 28
12. Groom, Shea | NJ | 26
Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 26
Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 26
15. Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 25
16. Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 24
17. Marta | ORL | 23
Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 23
Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 23
Mathias, Merritt | NC | 23
21. Rodríguez, Raquel | NJ | 22
Addo, Elizabeth | SEA | 22
Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 22
Boureille, Celeste | POR | 22
25. Ubogagu, Chioma | ORL | 21
Crnogorčević, Ana-Maria | POR | 21
Daly, Rachel | HOU | 21
Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 21
29. Johnson, Samantha | UTA | 20
Nielsen, Theresa | SEA | 20
Brooks, Amber | HOU | 20
van Egmond, Emily | ORL | 20
33. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 19
Heath, Tobin | POR | 19
Mewis, Samantha | NC | 19
36. Hamilton, Kristen | NC | 18
Dougherty Howard, Meggie | WAS | 18
Pugh, Mallory | WAS | 18
39. McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 17
Yanez, Beverly | SEA | 17
Raso, Hayley | POR | 17
42. Sonnett, Emily | POR | 16
Morgan, Alex | ORL | 16
Hill, Rachel | ORL | 16
Prince, Nichelle | HOU | 16
Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 16
Sinclair, Christine | POR | 16
48. Andrews, Morgan | SEA | 15
Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 15
Chapman, Allysha | HOU | 15
Gorry, Katrina | UTA | 15
Dunn, Crystal | NC | 15
Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 15
Pickett, Carson | ORL | 15

 

Fouls Won

1. Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 63
2. Horan, Lindsey | POR | 46
3. Zerboni, McCall | NC | 42
4. Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 33
5. Huerta, Sofia | HOU | 32
Daly, Rachel | HOU | 32
Dougherty Howard, Meggie | WAS | 32
8. Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 31
Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 31
10. Andressinha | POR | 30
11. Long, Allie | SEA | 29
12. McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 27
Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 27
Heath, Tobin | POR | 27
Mathias, Merritt | NC | 27
16. Sullivan, Andi | WAS | 26
Groom, Shea | NJ | 26
18. Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 25
19. Dunn, Crystal | NC | 24
Raso, Hayley | POR | 24
21. Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 23
Addo, Elizabeth | SEA | 23
Kerr, Sam | CHI | 23
24. Morgan, Alex | ORL | 22
Debinha | NC | 22
Motlhalo, Linda | HOU | 22
27. Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 21
Banini, Estefanía | WAS | 21
29. Marta | ORL | 19
O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 19
Killion, Sarah | NJ | 19
Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 19
Smith, Taylor | WAS | 19
34. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 18
Mewis, Kristie | HOU | 18
Ordega, Francisca | WAS | 18
37. Oyster, Megan | SEA | 17
Gorry, Katrina | UTA | 17
Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 17
40. LaBonta, Lo’eau | UTA | 16
41. Yanez, Beverly | SEA | 15
42. Matheson, Diana | UTA | 15
Edmonds, Kristen | ORL | 15
Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 15
Gibbons, Christina | NJ | 15
Sinclair, Christine | POR | 15
47. Weatherholt, Dani | ORL | 14
Ubogagu, Chioma | ORL | 14
Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 14
Chapman, Allysha | HOU | 14

 

Yellow Cards

1. Sonnett, Emily | POR | 5
Johnson, Samantha | UTA | 5
Horan, Lindsey | POR | 5
4. Tiernan, Madison | NJ | 4
Hamilton, Kristen | NC | 4
Stanton, Nikki | CHI | 4
Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 4
Daly, Rachel | HOU | 4
Jónsdóttir, Gunnhildur | UTA | 4
Mathias, Merritt | NC | 4
Nagasato, Yuki | CHI | 4
Sinclair, Christine | POR | 4
13. Colaprico, Danielle | CHI | 3
McCaskill, Savannah | NJ | 3
Killion, Sarah | NJ | 3
Mautz, Alyssa | CHI | 3
Zadorsky, Shelina | ORL | 3
Camila | ORL | 3
Corsie, Rachel | UTA | 3
Oyster, Megan | SEA | 3
Gilliland, Arin | CHI | 3
Brooks, Amber | HOU | 3
Taylor, Jodie | SEA | 3
Dougherty Howard, Meggie | WAS | 3
Ordega, Francisca | WAS | 3
26. Scott, Desiree | UTA | 2
Sauerbrunn, Becky | UTA | 2
Marta | ORL | 2
O’Sullivan, Denise | NC | 2
McNabb, Kristen | SEA | 2
Fishlock, Jess | SEA | 2
Ubogagu, Chioma | ORL | 2
Chapman, Allysha | HOU | 2
Naughton, Katie | CHI | 2
Dydasco, Caprice | WAS | 2
Comeau, Taylor | HOU | 2
Ratcliffe, Brittany | UTA | 2
Freeman, Mandy | NJ | 2
Mônica | ORL | 2
Matheson, Diana | UTA | 2
Hatch, Ashley | WAS | 2
Long, Allie | SEA | 2
Johnson, Estelle | WAS | 2
Addo, Elizabeth | SEA | 2
Leroux, Sydney | ORL | 2
Kennedy, Alanna | ORL | 2
Rapinoe, Megan | SEA | 2
Klingenberg, Meghan | POR | 2
Barnes, Lauren | SEA | 2
Catley, Steph | SEA | 2
Church, Whitney | WAS | 2
Kerr, Sam | CHI | 2
van Egmond, Emily | ORL | 2
Gibbons, Christina | NJ | 2
Pickett, Carson | ORL | 2

 

Red Cards

1. Marta | ORL | 1
Lloyd, Carli | NJ | 1

 


Opta Event Definitions

From Opta’s site:

Chances Created

Assists plus key passes (final pass or pass/shot leading to the recipient of the ball having an attempt at goal without scoring.)

Tackles

A tackle is defined as where a player connects with the ball in ground challenge where she successfully takes the ball away from the woman in possession. 

  • The tackled player must clearly be in possession of the ball before the tackle is made

A Tackle Won is deemed to be where the tackler or one of her team-mates regains possession as a result of the challenge, or that the ball goes out of play and is “safe.”

A Tackle Lost is where a tackle is made but the ball goes to an opposition player.

Clearance

This is a defensive action where a player kicks the ball away from his own goal with no intended recipient of the ball.

Block

This is where a player blocks a shot from an opposing player.

Interception

This is where a player intentionally intercepts a pass by moving into the line of the intended ball.

Recovery

This is where a player wins back the ball when it has gone loose or where the ball has been played directly to her.

Foul conceded

A foul conceded is defined as any infringement that is penalized as foul play by a referee. Offsides are not given as a foul conceded.

Foul won

A foul won is defined as where a player wins a free-kick or penalty for their team after being fouled by an opposing player.

Touches

A sum of all events where a player touches the ball, so excludes things like Aerial challenge lost or Challenge lost. 

Duels

A duel is an 50-50 contest between two players of opposing sides in the match, including aerial duels. For every Duel Won there is a corresponding Duel Lost depending on the outcome of the Duel.

Aerial Duel won – Aerial Duel lost

This is where two players challenge in the air against each other. The player that wins the ball is deemed to have won the duel. When more than two players are involved the player closest to the duel winner is given an Aerial Duel lost.

2018 NWSL Playoffs schedule, broadcast info

Thorns vs. Reign and Courage vs. Red Stars

Portland Thorns FC, Seattle Reign FC, North Carolina Courage and Chicago Red Stars in the 2018 NWSL Playoffs. (Photo credit: isiphotos.com)

2018 NWSL Playoffs schedule and broadcast information:

Saturday, September 15 at 3 p.m. ET on Lifetime

Portland Thorns FC vs. Seattle Reign FC

Providence Park in Portland, Oregon

Buy Tickets


Tuesday, September 18 at 9 p.m. ET on ESPNews

North Carolina Courage vs. Chicago Red Stars

Providence Park in Portland, Oregon

Buy Tickets


Saturday, September 22 at 4:30 p.m. ET on Lifetime

NWSL Championship

Providence Park in Portland, Oregon

Tickets to the 2018 NWSL Championship match are on sale by calling (888) 736-6849 or online at www.thornsfc.com.


Every playoff game will be streamed live via the Lifetime App and ESPN App, with authentication required in the United States. International fans will be able to watch every game on the NWSL app and NWSLsoccer.com.